1914-1919 Roll of Honour War Memorial

War memorial almost lost forever as wartime researchers struggle to find it a new home.  The Roll of Honour was originally displayed at the Woodlands Lodge, Haworth, No185 (N) of the Grand United Order of Oddfellows Friendly Society for their fallen and served members in the Great War of 1914-1919. The memorial is a rectangular wooden board which has supporting pillars and a cornice. The Coat of Arms is at the top with the names of those who fell listed below it. The inscription reads “1914 Roll of Honour 1919/ Amicita Amor Et Veritas/ Members who have made the/ Supreme sacrifice.” Listed are the names of the 83 who served, 10 of whom sadly died and 73 who returned. The Regiments and Corps named on the Roll of Honour are listed below; - Army Ordinance Corps (AOC) - Army Service Corps (ASC) - Army Service Corps (motor transport) (ASC (mt)) - Coldstream Guards (CG) - Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding Regiment) (D of W (WR)) - Durham Light Infantry (DLI) - East Lancashire Regiment (EL) - East Yorkshire Regiment (EY) - King’s Liverpool Regiment (KL) - Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (KOYLI) - Labour Corps (Lab C) - Machine Gun Corps (MGC) - North Staffordshire Regiment (N. Staff) - Northumberland Fusiliers (NF) - Royal Air Force (RAF) - Royal Engineers (RE) - Royal Engineers Signals (RE Signals) - Royal Field Artillery (RFA) - Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) - Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) (BW (RH)) - Royal Scot’s Fusiliers (RSF) - Royal Scots (RS) - Royal Warwickshire Regiment (RW) - South Staffordshire Regiment (S. Staff) - The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) (SR) - West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales Own) (WY) - York and Lancaster Regiment (Y&L) - Yorkshire Hussars (YH) Measuring 2.2x2m finding a new home for the war memorial was not an easy task, including its relocation by which it was proudly carried down the main street to its new location as the van was too small. Transferred by The Men of Worth Project C.I.C. into the custodianship of The Wyedean Weaving Co. Ltd, who together with the War Memorials Trust jointly funded its repair and conservation. As suppliers of ceremonial parade wear and accoutrement to the UK Ministry of Defence, Wyedean is a perfect choice, also allowing it to stay in its hometown Haworth. Even though the Roll of Honour’s new location is only a few hundred yards away from its original site, it was Crest Regalia, a long term customer of Wyedean’s based on the Isle of Wight that read Men of Worth’s blog seeking a new home for the memorial and put Wyedean and Men of Worth in touch. Without this intervention the Roll of Honour may well have been lost, along with many other war memorials which cannot be rehoused and end up being discarded, lost, unloved or broken. Several of the family names listed on the Roll of Honour will be recognisable to many in the Keighley and the Worth Valley area. It is a tremendous memorial full of history, [...]

2021-03-30T15:42:56+01:0030 October 2018|

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is the Canadian national police service and an agency of the Ministry of Public Safety Canada. THE RCMP is unique in that it is a national, federal, provincial and municipal policing body. The RCMP’s 28,000 staff provides policing to all Canadians and is present in eight provinces (except Ontario and Quebec). The force’s scope of operations now includes organised crime, terrorism, illicit drugs, economic crimes and offences that threaten the integrity of Canada’s national borders. In May 1873 the Parliament of Canada established a central police force which was made up of 150 recruits sent to Manitoba and named theN orth-West Mounted Police (NWMP).  During 1847 its members marched to Alberta and established a permanent post at Fort Macleod where half of its recruits, now up to 275 members, were posted. The rest were sent to Fort Edmonton of Fort Pelly. In 1919 the NWMP decided to merge with the Dominion Police and together they would be named the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. After World War II the RCMP expanded and its role changed to a provincial force. In 1974 the first women was accepted into the force and its responsibilities expanded to airport policing VIP security and drug enforcement. Wyedean manufacture the trouser striping for the RCMP.

2021-03-30T15:18:21+01:0022 May 2018|

Dalton, Barton & Co Ltd.

Dalton Barton & Co was a textile manufacturing company founded near Coventry on the 16th of January 1852. The name Dalton and Barton corresponded with that of its two founding weavers: Robert Arnold Dalton and George Samuel Barton. Robert Dalton was born in 1825, the son of a plumber and glazier, but at the age of 14 he started a 7-year apprenticeship with William and John Sargent, who were ribbon makers in Coventry. In 1847 he became a ribbon manufacturer. Later in life he was elected an alderman and mayor of the city. Little is known of George Barton, only that he was a year younger than Robert Dalton. It wasn’t until 29th May 1872 that the company became a limited company. Dalton Barton & Co Ltd had an incorporated number of 6313, meaning that there were only 6312 incorporated companies before it so it was one of the first few. The company flourished and extended its range from ribbon making to narrow fabrics, braids, upholstery trimmings, uniform regalia and lanyards. The Company had a huge boost when it received the contract to produce Australian moquette tape used in railway carriages. Both the Coventry factory and its London marketing company continued to prosper and they became one of the largest haberdashery wholesalers in the world. In 1940 during WWII disaster struck when an air raid destroyed the whole Coventry factory. By this time the factory had focused all of its efforts on military narrow fabrics such a chevron lace, medal ribbon and parachute harnesses etc. This meant it was able to obtain Government funding to build a new factory on Mason Road, Coventry. As the war progressed, sourcing the pure silk for the weaving of medal ribbons became increasingly difficult. Nylon was suggested as an alternative - at the time it was a newly-developed material. King George VI refused stating that his award medals were for superior acts of gallantry which would be manufactured from only the finest materials. David Wright, father of Robin Wright, the present owner, joined the company in 1959. He had no experience of narrow fabrics but was skilled in textile manufacturing management and design. He joined the company and moved the factory near the river Wye in Gloucester, which is close to the Forest of Dean. David then renamed the company Wyedean Weaving. In 1964 a severance was proposed by Dalton Barton and its subsidiary Wyedean Weaving. David Wright struck a deal to transfer all of the haberdashery production looms, in exchange for him being allowed to purchase the military production machinery. Wyedean Weaving was relocated to Haworth, West Yorkshire where David grew up and focused its energies on uniform accoutrement such as sergeant sashes, chevrons, RAF rank braid and naval collar tape which was mainly sold to customers such as the Ministry of Defence. To view our range of narrow fabrics click here.

2021-03-30T15:47:41+01:0025 January 2018|

Merry Christmas from the Wyedean team

  Merry Christmas from all of the team at Wyedean This year, instead of sending Christmas cards the company made a donation to our nominated charity: Airedale Hospital Neo-Natal Clinic. To read more about the unit click here. We close for Christmas on Friday 22nd December and will reopen on Tuesday the 2nd January.

2021-03-30T15:48:47+01:0019 December 2017|

Queen to formally commission HMS Queen Elizabeth.

The Queen has formally commissioned the aircraft carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth. She was joined by Princess Annie, First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir Philip Jones and Prime Minister Theresa May. It was the first time the Queen had seen the new flagship since Rosyth in July 2014. A commissioning ceremony usually takes place once a ship has completed its sea trials. In this specific ceremony The Queen said a few words and then the commissioning warrant was read. The Blue Ensign has been replaced with the White Ensign. The Blue Ensign has been flying from the ship during trials. The replacement of the Blue Ensign to the White Ensign symbolises the acceptance of HMS Queen Elizabeth into Her Majesty’s fleet. This also makes it an Official Navy Warship. The only milestone left for HMS Queen Elizabeth is the flight trials, which will begin in 2018. The HMS Queen Elizabeth is set to be deployed, with jets on board, in 2021. Her sister ship, HMS Prince of Wales has also been formally named and is structurally complete. Both of the new aircraft carriers are being delivered by Aircraft Carrier Alliance. We stock the HMS Queen Elizabeth ship crest and cap tally on our website. View the items here.

2021-03-30T15:49:12+01:0011 December 2017|

The Royal Regiment Of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of Scotland is the most senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment forming a core part of the British Army. The regiment consists of four regular battalions and two reserve battalions. As each battalion was formerly an individual regiment, they all maintain their former regimental pipes and drums to carry on the traditions of their antecedent regiments. The Royal Regiment of Scotland was formed in 2004 by the Secretary of State for Defence, Geoff Hoon, after a British Army restructuring. The regiment, along with the Rifles, is one of two line infantry regiments to maintain its own regular military band within the Corps of Army Music. This was formed through the amalgamation of the Highland Band and the Lowland Band of the Scottish Division. All battalions in the Royal Regiment of Scotland took the name of their former individual regiments. This was to preserve regional ties and former regimental identities. The order of battle is shown below: Regular battalions The Royal Scots Borderers The Royal Highland Fusiliers The Black Watch The Highlanders Balaklava Company Reserve battalions 52nd Lowland 51st Highland  The Royal Scots Borderers operate in a light infantry role and are based at Palace Barracks in Belfast. The battalion, however, is moving to Aldershot and converting to a specialised Infantry battalion, to contribute to counter-terrorism and building stability overseas. The uniform and dress of the battalions differs slightly: hackles are worn while in PCS combat dress, and each battalion wears a different colour. The Royal Scots Borderers wear a black plume while the Royal Highland Fusiliers’ is white. The new Dress Uniforms incorporate a number of traditions: all battalions wear the Lowland pattern Glengarry and all battalions wear Blackcock tail feathers in the No.1 and No.2 dress which are attached to the Glengarry. The Band of the Royal Regiment of Scotland wears the feather bonnet which has a red over white hackle and scarlet doublet in Full Dress uniform. The regiment’s new cap badge was unveiled at the Edinburgh Military Tattoo in 2005. The new badge incorporates the Saltire of St Andrew and the Lion Rampant of the Royal Standard of Scotland. These are two prominent nations’ symbols. The Royal Regiment of Scotland’s motto is Nemo Me Impune Lacessit (No One Assails Me With Impunity). This is the motto of the Order of the Thistle, Scotland’s highest order of chivalry, and was the motto for four of the pre-existing Scottish regiments. To view our range of uniform accessories for the Royal Regiment of Scotland click here.

2021-03-30T15:53:02+01:0017 October 2017|

Sprang Weaving

Sprang is an ancient method of constructing fabric that gives it an appearance similar to netting so that it has natural elasticity. Sprang, unlike netting, however, is constructed from entirely warp threads. The sprang structure is close to a Leno weave but without the weft so that it is inherently flexible. Although examples of sprang can be seen back in the Bronze Age, there were no written records until the late nineteenth century. These days knitting has taken over sprang constructions, however, there are many examples in museums of product woven in a sprang construction which is often misidentified as knitted. Wyedean possesses a sprang fabric hand loom, which, to the best of our knowledge is one of only two in existence, the other we understand is in London owned by the Royal School of Needlework. Our loom hasn’t been used for many years and was last used in the 1980s to manufacture British Army Generals Guards Full Dress and Undress waist sash ribbons, also for Scottish Regiment Officers’ shoulder sash, all woven in pure silk and 2% gold threads. Unfortunately, these products were converted over to power loom production using synthetic threads in the late 1980s as a cost saving measure. To view our range of sashes click here.

2021-03-30T15:53:41+01:0017 October 2017|

Royal Hospital Chelsea

The Royal Hospital Chelsea is a nursing home and retirement facility for British Army veterans. The London-based Hospital is located on Royal Hospital Road in Chelsea. The charity relies on donations to help towards the day-to-day running of the accommodation. Any veteran who is over the age of 65 and has served as a regular soldier may apply to become a Chelsea Pensioner, or resident at the Hospital. They must also have found themselves in a time of need and must be ‘of good character’. Applicants must not have any dependant spouse or family and any former Officers must have served at least 12 years in the ranks before receiving a commission. King Charles II founded the Royal Hospital in 1682 as a retreat for veterans. Some of the first to be admitted were those injured at the Battle of Sedgemoor. It wasn’t until 2002 that the Sovereign’s Mace was presented to the hospital – up until that point the hospital had no colours or distinctions -the Mace is now carried at all ceremonial events. Until 2009, there were no women admitted to the hospital. Winifred Phillips and Dorothy Hughes were the first ladies admitted. The Chelsea Pensioners are entitled to come and go from the Royal Hospital as they please. Within the hospital, the pensioners are encouraged to wear the blue uniform. On ceremonial occasions a red frock coat is worn, with cocked hats. The hospital maintains a military based culture. Each in-pensioner is put into one of three companies. Each company is headed by a Captain of Invalids who is responsible for the day-to-day management of the pensioners. Today there are roughly 320 army veterans who call the Royal Hospital Chelsea home. Many have served in Korea, Cyprus, Falkland Islands, World War II and Northern Ireland. We supply uniform accessories for the Royal Hospital Chelsea. Click here to view our items.

2021-03-30T15:59:41+01:004 September 2017|

Dalton Barton World War II Letter

The Wyedean Weaving Company established itself in Haworth in 1964 as a manufacturer of narrow fabrics, braid and uniform accoutrement. The business originated in Coventry around 1850 and was previously known as Dalton, Barton and Co Ltd. During WWII, the main factory in Coventry was completely destroyed during the Blitz in 1941. The company’s East End London warehouse and store in Jewin Street London were also later destroyed. For this reason the company possesses no artefacts or records dating from before the Blitz, nor evidence of this difficult time in the Company’s history…that is until recently when the letter shown below came to light from one of Dalton Barton’s war-time customers. Gary Smith is the current owner of fourth-generation upholsterers JE Smith and Son, and he tracked Wyedean down when he found the letter from Dalton, Barton hidden away in the company’s workshop. Gary’s grandfather purchased webbing from Dalton, Barton during the war and his company manufactured sewing bags for gas masks. JE Smith and Son is approaching its 100th year in business and these days focuses on high quality upholstery work. The company recently helped manufacture a bespoke chair called the Windsor Castle chair designed by Shaun Brownell from RhubarbLondon. The chair imitates the scarlet woollen ceremonial uniform of the Irish Guards and is replete with detailed buttons, buckles and accoutrement, which coincidently Wyedean manufactures and supplies to all the Guard’s regiments. To view Wyedean’s range of ceremonial regalia and accoutrement items click here.

2021-03-30T16:00:01+01:0017 August 2017|

Bespoke Wedding Cap Tallies

A cap tally is a black nylon ribbon which is usually tied into a bow on the left-hand side of a Royal Navy sailor’s cap. The tally is black with a gold inscription and usually bears the name of the ship to which the sailor belongs. During World War II the ship’s name was often left off the cap tally to protect the ship from any espionage. A cap tally bow is notoriously difficult to tie. The ribbon is wrapped round the hat, with the inscription positioned in the middle of the hat. A bow is tied to the left of the cap. Wyedean is able to manufacture bespoke cap tallies containing custom text. Recently we have supplied funeral cap tallies as well as wedding cap tallies. When checking out with the custom design cap tally http://www.wyedeanstores.com/custom-design-bespoke-cap-tally   Simply write in the comments box the text you would like the tally to contain.

2021-03-30T16:02:55+01:008 August 2017|
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