Wyedean

Home/Wyedean

Mess Dress Uniform

Mess dress uniform is not to be confused with full dress uniform. Mess dress is the semi-formal uniform worn by the military, police and other public uniformed services. The uniform is worn for certain ceremonies and celebrations on private occasions.  Design may vary but they mainly consist of a mess jacket, trousers, white dress shirt and are worn with medals or other insignia. Mess dress is seen as an alternative to black tie for evening wear and is sometimes known as half dress. Mess dress is worn predominantly by commissioned officers and non-commissioned officers. It can however be worn by some senior enlisted personnel.  The Royal Navy has two forms of evening dress. Mess dress (No. 2A) consists of a mess jacket, plain navy blue mess trousers, white waistcoat and black bow tie. The mess undress (No. 2B) consists of a mess jacket, plain navy blue mess trousers, blue waistcoat or black cummerbund and a black bow tie.  Officers in the Royal Navy with the rank of Captain and above wear gold laced trousers and may wear the undress tailcoat with either mess dress of mess undress.  The Royal Marines mess differs from the Royal Navy in that the jacket is scarlet. The Royal Marines also wear a scarlet cummerbund. The British Army mess uniform appeared in 1845, initially utilizing the short ‘shell jacket’. The original purpose was to provide a comfortable and inexpensive alternative to the full dress uniforms. After World War I, full dress uniforms mostly disappeared and mess dress became the most colourful and traditional uniform to be worn by most officers in the British Army.  The most commonly worn mess dress in the British Army is the No. 10 Mess Dress. It can differ slightly depending on the regiment or corps but mostly this includes the short mess jacket. The colours of the mess jackets and trousers reflect the traditional full dress uniforms of the regiments. Usually the jackets are scarlet, dark blue or rifle green and are worn with embroidered waistcoats. The jackets are worn with high waisted, very tight, trousers called overalls.  Ornamental spurs are often worn by cavalry regiments and traditionally mounted corps. Female officers and soldiers  wear mess jackets over a dark coloured ankle length evening dress.  The Royal Air Force mess dress is similar to the Royal Navy, except the jacket and trousers are mid blue. The No. 5 Mess Dress is also worn with a slate grey cummerbund. For women the same uniform is worn except they wear their high waisted jacket with an ankle length blue grey skirt. Unlike the men’s jacket, which has a pointed lapel, the ladies jacket features a shawl collar.  Wyedean work along side military tailors by manufacturing and applying the braiding to the Mess Dress uniforms. Contact us today with your requirements.

2021-03-30T14:50:35+01:0027 November 2019|

Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday 2019

Remembrance Sunday, will be held on Sunday 10th November. The National Service of remembrance will be  held at the Cenotaph at Whitehall in London at 11am. The service honours the service and sacrifices of the Armed Forces who fought in the two World Wars and any other conflicts. This yearly remembrance ensures no one is forgotten and honours those who sacrificed themselves to protect our freedom.  Every year up to 10,000 veterans, current serving Armed Forces personnel and bereaved spouses and first generation descendants take part in the March Past. From 9am on the 10th November the Royal British Legion detachments  form up on Horse Guards Parade. At 10am the March Past begins then at 11am there is a two minute silence in which the whole country falls silent to remember those who gave their lives. The beginning and the end of the silence is marked at 11.00 and 11.02 by the firing of  guns by the Kings Troop at Horse Guards Parade The 11th November marks Armistice Day. This year will mark 101 years since the end of the First World War. On November 11th 1918 the armistice was signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany. This stated an end to any conflict and an end to the war. This was signed at 11am, “on the eleventh house of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.” In many of the Allied nations, and France, this is a national holiday.  Remembrance does not glorify war. Its symbol, the red poppy, is a sign of remembrance and the hope for a peaceful future. The poppy is greatly appreciated by those who it is intended to support and shows your respect. This well-established symbol is one that carries a wealth of history and meaning. During WW1, much of the countryside on the front in Western Europe was repeatedly bombarded by artillery shells. This turned the landscapes into bleak and barren scenes where nothing could grow, apart from the poppy flower. The Flanders poppy flourished in the middle of all the destruction, growing into tens of thousands.  Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, saw the poppies which gave him his inspiration to write the famous poem ‘In Flanders Fields’. This poem led America academic, Moina Michael to adopt the poppy into the memory of those who had fallen in the war. Anna Guerin, in 1921, sold the poppies in the UK where she met Earl Haigh , the founder of the Royal British Legion. He was persuaded to adopt the poppy as the emblem for the Legion in the UK and so in 1921 they ordered nine million poppies and sold them that year. They raised £106,000 to help the veterans which became the first ‘Poppy Appeal’. In today’s Poppy Appeal, 40,000 volunteers distribute 40 million poppies.  Remembrance Sunday and Armistice Day offer us all a chance to remember not just those who fought, but what they fought for. Today in the UK, remembrance is very different to how it was 100 [...]

2021-03-30T14:50:56+01:0024 October 2019|

Wyedean’s bespoke commissions

Wyedean is known mostly for manufacturing accessories and accoutrements for the Armed Forces around the world.  We are, occasionally asked to produce some specialist items too. The business once received an order from The Royal Jordanian Army which had a camel mounted ceremonial regiment. The order was for fringing to hang over the camels eyes, similar to false eyelashes. The purpose was to stop flies or sand irritating the camel’s eyes. Over the years the fringe has become more ornate for ceremonial purposes. We supply a wide range of headwear for use in many different applications; from the standard ceremonial peaked caps to cadet helmets and covers which we were commissioned to design, develop and test. We have also more recently manufactured the bespoke costume tea cup headwear for the famous Yorkshire Tea marching band. One of our newer products is the Kevlar webbing. This is a key component in protective, flame resistant clothing. The webbing is used by blue light services and is useful where protection is needed against physical, electrical, heat or chemical particulates. More recently our Kevlar webbing has been used  in circus’s around the world on juggling sticks which are set alight. As Wyedean is known for the manufacture of braids and tapes, we were asked to produce thousands of meters of binding tape/ bandages for the film The Mummy. The bandages were soaked in tea to achieve the desired effect. As well as tape used in films, Wyedean has also made a jute webbing used to lower coffins into graves and also a saltpeter-dipped touch cord for firing antique cannon used in salutes.  Wyedean’s skills are not just limited to military uniforms. A recent commission saw the company manufacture bespoke flying suits for a helicopter transport company.  The business was also commissioned by one of Michael Jackson’s costumiers to manufacture a military type of cord/ frogging to be stitched on to one of his jackets. The costumier told us that the costume would also have cooling installed by way of thin tubes of chilled liquid circulating within to help keep him cool during his performance.  Wyedean regularly take on bespoke commissions. Contact our sales team today to discuss your requirements.

2021-03-30T14:54:26+01:0020 June 2019|

D-Day Anniversary

Each year, thousands of people, descend on Normandy in France to remember those who risked their lives in D-Day, Operation Overlord and the Battle of Normandy. This year celebrates the 75th anniversary of the tragic battle. The anniversary will be commemorated with military parades, fireworks, airdrops, concerts and military camp re-enactments. The 6th June 1944 marks the D-Day Landings and the Battle of Normandy commenced, where men from all over the world came to fight the Nazi regime. Around 156,000 American, British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along a 50 mile stretch in Normandy. General Dwight Eisenhower was appointed commander of the Operation Overlord and he told the troops “You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you”. The amphibious invasions began at 6:30am and by the end of the day more than 4,000 Allied troops lost their lives. Thousands more were wounded or missing. By the end of August 1944, the Allies had reached Seine River and Paris was liberated. The Normandy invasion started the turn against the Nazis and by May 8th 1954 the Allies formally accepted the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany and Hitler committed suicide a week earlier on April 30th. In January 2018, the French Ministry of Culture announced the D-Day landing beaches to be included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. This will ensure the sites are preserved and will help to transmit the universal messages they represents. Since the tragic event, they have come to symbolize universal hopes for freedom and peace.

2021-03-30T15:01:24+01:0025 March 2019|

Textile Waste Recycled and given to Local Schools.

Wyedean currently bags up its waste yarn, material off-cuts and cones, and rather than processing it through traditional waste disposal methods recently delivered these to local schools for children to re-use.  Recent recipients of these materials were schools in Oldfield, Stanbury, Ingrow, Haworth, Oxenhope and Oakworth. The cones are used by school children for modelling while the materials and yarns are used for gluing and craft projects. We also donated 80 kilos to a school near Boroughbridge. Altogether Wyedean has donated and delivered over 250 cones and 200 kilos of textile waste.  Wyedean is now working towards a new target of distributing 100 kilos of waste amongst local schools per year.  Not only is this is a fun resource for local schools, but it’s also good for the environment as this waste would ordinarily be disposed of in landfill.

2021-03-30T15:01:37+01:005 February 2019|

Wyedean at the Movies

While Wyedean primarily manufactures regalia and accoutrement for the military, armed and uniformed services, it also supplies to the film and television industry through production companies and costumiers. In fact, the company has supplied goods for numerous high profile blockbuster movies and TV productions in recent years. Some of the more famous movies Wyedean has supplied goods for include Fury starring Brad Pitt, Gulliver’s Travels starring Jack Black, The Mummy, Harry Potter and Saving Private Ryan. John Cleese played Nearly Headless Nick in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Wyedean supplied the tunic buttons worn by Nick. Wyedean also supplied the production company behind Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan with webbings for use on the soldier’s uniforms. For The Mummy, Wyedean was tasked with producing thousands of metres of binding tape/bandages that were wrapped around the film’s mummies. Wyedean supplied a wide range of army uniform regalia for Gulliver’s Travels which starred Billy Connolly and Jack Black. View a BBC news clip.The helmet chin straps worn by the soldiers in Brad Pitt’s Fury were manufactured by Wyedean. Other films Wyedean items can be found in include Master and Commander, Saving Private Ryan, The Man in the Iron Mask, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Band of Brothers, The Four Feathers, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. If you represent a film or television production company, or work in the costume or wardrobe department then we’d love to hear from you. Wyedean regularly takes on bespoke commissions and is happy to discuss your requirements.

2021-03-30T15:01:46+01:0029 January 2019|

Merry Christmas from all at Wyedean

Merry Christmas from all at Wyedean. This year, instead of sending Christmas cards the company made a donation to our nominated charity: Keighley and District National Autistic Society. To read more about the charity click here. We close on Friday 21st December and reopen on Wednesday 2nd of January.

2021-03-30T15:02:18+01:0011 December 2018|

Remembrance Day 2018

On Sunday the 11th of November 2018 at 11am the country will fall silent to remember those who fought for our country. This year Armistice Day and Remembrance Day fall on the same day, sometimes this day is also known more informally as Poppy Day. Each year veterans participate in the Cenotaph March Past at the Parade in Whitehall. The red poppy has become the symbol for Remembrance Sunday with poppy wreaths being laid at cenotaphs all over the country to commemorate Britain’s war dead. In more recent years there has been an increased appearance of the white poppy, a pacifist symbol of remembrance. White poppies, according to the Peace Pledge Union (PPU) represent remembrance for all victims of war, commitment to peace and a challenge to the glamorisation of conflict. The white poppy was produced in 1933 by the Women’s Co-operative Guild to symbolise ‘no more war’ and represents all victims of all wars. The red poppy appeal is organised by the Royal British Legion (RBL) and specifically represents remembrance associated with the British Armed Forces. There has been a long standing opposition to the white poppy, with critics suggesting that it undermines the message of remembrance around Armistice Day. However, St John’s Ambulance has changed its dress code policy to allow volunteers to wear the white poppy as an alternative. During the war when the soil was churned up by endless fighting, poppies still managed to flourish leading the red poppy to become a symbol of remembrance of the First World War. The poppy is also seen as a symbol to honour the millions of current servicemen and women who fight in our Armed Forces. Charities such as Blesma The Limbless Veterans also provide support to amputees from the Armed Forces. They currently help 1873 amputees who lost limbs in the line of duty. Every year a member of Wyedean attends the local service in Haworth to lay a wreath to honour those who have fallen. Which service will you be attending this year? Will you hold a two minutes silence at 11am? Listen out on Sunday for the half muffled church bells. To make a donation to the Poppy Appeal visit the British Legion website here: http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/

2021-03-30T15:06:25+01:0030 October 2018|

1914-1919 Roll of Honour War Memorial

War memorial almost lost forever as wartime researchers struggle to find it a new home.  The Roll of Honour was originally displayed at the Woodlands Lodge, Haworth, No185 (N) of the Grand United Order of Oddfellows Friendly Society for their fallen and served members in the Great War of 1914-1919. The memorial is a rectangular wooden board which has supporting pillars and a cornice. The Coat of Arms is at the top with the names of those who fell listed below it. The inscription reads “1914 Roll of Honour 1919/ Amicita Amor Et Veritas/ Members who have made the/ Supreme sacrifice.” Listed are the names of the 83 who served, 10 of whom sadly died and 73 who returned. The Regiments and Corps named on the Roll of Honour are listed below; - Army Ordinance Corps (AOC) - Army Service Corps (ASC) - Army Service Corps (motor transport) (ASC (mt)) - Coldstream Guards (CG) - Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding Regiment) (D of W (WR)) - Durham Light Infantry (DLI) - East Lancashire Regiment (EL) - East Yorkshire Regiment (EY) - King’s Liverpool Regiment (KL) - Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (KOYLI) - Labour Corps (Lab C) - Machine Gun Corps (MGC) - North Staffordshire Regiment (N. Staff) - Northumberland Fusiliers (NF) - Royal Air Force (RAF) - Royal Engineers (RE) - Royal Engineers Signals (RE Signals) - Royal Field Artillery (RFA) - Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) - Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) (BW (RH)) - Royal Scot’s Fusiliers (RSF) - Royal Scots (RS) - Royal Warwickshire Regiment (RW) - South Staffordshire Regiment (S. Staff) - The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) (SR) - West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales Own) (WY) - York and Lancaster Regiment (Y&L) - Yorkshire Hussars (YH) Measuring 2.2x2m finding a new home for the war memorial was not an easy task, including its relocation by which it was proudly carried down the main street to its new location as the van was too small. Transferred by The Men of Worth Project C.I.C. into the custodianship of The Wyedean Weaving Co. Ltd, who together with the War Memorials Trust jointly funded its repair and conservation. As suppliers of ceremonial parade wear and accoutrement to the UK Ministry of Defence, Wyedean is a perfect choice, also allowing it to stay in its hometown Haworth. Even though the Roll of Honour’s new location is only a few hundred yards away from its original site, it was Crest Regalia, a long term customer of Wyedean’s based on the Isle of Wight that read Men of Worth’s blog seeking a new home for the memorial and put Wyedean and Men of Worth in touch. Without this intervention the Roll of Honour may well have been lost, along with many other war memorials which cannot be rehoused and end up being discarded, lost, unloved or broken. Several of the family names listed on the Roll of Honour will be recognisable to many in the Keighley and the Worth Valley area. It is a tremendous memorial full of history, [...]

2021-03-30T15:42:56+01:0030 October 2018|
Go to Top