Tag - Military

Soldier With Poppy

Remembrance Day 2018

On Sunday the 11th of November 2018 at 11am the country will fall silent to remember those who fought for our country. This year Armistice Day and Remembrance Day fall on the same day, sometimes this day is also known more informally as Poppy Day. Each year veterans participate in the Cenotaph March Past at the Parade in Whitehall. The red poppy has become the symbol for Remembrance Sunday with poppy wreaths being laid at cenotaphs all over the country to commemorate Britain’s war dead. In more recent years there has been an increased appearance of the white poppy, a pacifist symbol of remembrance. White poppies, according to the Peace Pledge Union (PPU) represent remembrance for all victims of war, commitment to peace and a challenge to the glamorisation of conflict. The white poppy was produced in 1933 by the Women’s Co-operative Guild to symbolise ‘no more war’ and represents all victims of all wars. The red poppy appeal is organised by [...]

Windsor Castle

The Military Knights of Windsor

The Military Knights of Windsor were known informally as the Poor Knights. Originally known as the Alms Knights, they are retired officers who receive a pension and accommodation at Windsor Castle. They are commanded by the Governor of the Military Knights of Windsor, who is a senior officer who has also retired. Retired Officers must become a Military Knight before the age of 65 and places are given to applicants in needy circumstances who are married. Military Knights provide support for the Order of the Garter and for the services of St. George’s Chapel. The Military Knights of Windsor participate in the Order’s processions and escort the Kings and Ladies of the Garter and are not paid for their duties today. During the reign of King Edward III, following the Battle of Crecy (1346), the Alms Knights of St George’s Chapel were established. Originally, veteran warriors were called to ‘serve God continually in prayer’. Duties included attending four services per day [...]

Military Funerals

Military Funerals

A military funeral is a memorial given by the military for a serviceman who died in battle, a veteran or prominent military figures. A military funeral may include the firing of a volley of shots as a salute, drumming, a flag draped over the coffin or a guard of honour. In British Army military funerals, reserved arms are carried and the Last Post and Rouse of Reveille are sounded. Any Service personnel who died while serving are entitled to a private funeral or a funeral at public expense. Generally, there is no ceremonial at a private funeral. This normally depends on the next of kin in conjunction with the unit. Military funerals take place with some or all military honours depending on the circumstances. Any salutes of guns are fired after the body has been laid to rest. The Military honours are: – Bearer Party – Pall – Bearers – Insignia Bearers – Escort and Firing Party of Gun Salute – Musical support – Minute Guns Personnel who have served [...]

Military Chaplains

Military Chaplains

A chaplain is a religious representative who is attached to a secular institution such as a prison, military unit or hospital. Originally, the world chaplain referred to a representative of the Christian faith, but is now applied to all faiths and philosophical traditions. The first recorded English military chaplains were priests on board vessels during the 8th century, however, the current form of military chaplain dates back to the First World War. A military chaplain provides pastoral, emotional and spiritual support to service personnel. They often conduct religious services whilst at sea or on a military base and are nominated or commissioned in different ways in different countries. A military chaplain could be an army-trained soldier with theological training or an ordained person who is nominated to the army by religious authorities. The Ministry of Defence employs chaplains in the UK, but their authority comes from their church. The Royal Navy chaplains are sent on a 16 week bespoke training course. This [...]

Dalton Barton

Dalton, Barton & Co Ltd.

Dalton Barton & Co was a textile manufacturing company founded near Coventry on the 16th of January 1852. The name Dalton and Barton corresponded with that of its two founding weavers: Robert Arnold Dalton and George Samuel Barton. Robert Dalton was born in 1825, the son of a plumber and glazier, but at the age of 14 he started a 7-year apprenticeship with William and John Sargent, who were ribbon makers in Coventry. In 1847 he became a ribbon manufacturer. Later in life he was elected an alderman and mayor of the city. Little is known of George Barton, only that he was a year younger than Robert Dalton. It wasn’t until 29th May 1872 that the company became a limited company. Dalton Barton & Co Ltd had an incorporated number of 6313, meaning that there were only 6312 incorporated companies before it so it was one of the first few. The company flourished and extended its range from ribbon making to [...]

Cocked Hat

Cocked Hats

A bicorne, or cocked hat, is a two-cornered cocked hat which was worn during the 18th and 19th centuries and was adopted from the European and American military and naval officers. Today the bicorne is mostly associated with Napoleon Bonaparte and this style of hat was worn widely by most generals and staff officers until 1914. The bicorne descended from the tricorne. There was usually a cockade in the national colours at the front of the hat, but later on the hat became more triangular in shape and the two ends became more pointed. During the 1790s the hat was worn side-to-side. Some were even designed so they could be folded flat. This style was known as a chapeau-bras. During World War I the bicorne was worn as part of the full dress for officers. By the Second World War the hat had almost disappeared in this context. In the UK, cocked hats are worn during some ceremonial occasions: During the Trooping of the [...]

Scots Grey Eagle

Flag of the 45th Line

Ensign Charles Ewart was a Scottish soldier of the Royal North British Dragoons and is most famous for capturing the regimental eagle of the 45th Regiment of the Line flag at the Battle of Waterloo. The French Imperial Eagle was gilded bronze and fixed to the top of a staff carrying the standard of the French 45th Infantry Regiment. The imperial eagle is one of the most iconic objects from the Napoleonic period and was a symbol of pride and loyalty among French troops who would form the backbone of Napoleon’s newly-formed regime. On June 10th 1815, the 45eme de la Ligne received its new eagle which was carried into the Battle of Waterloo by Pierre Guillot, where it would, after a bloody and brutal battle, be famously captured by Ewart. This symbolic victory made Ewart a hero and this captured eagle is now kept in Edinburgh Castle as one of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards most prized honours. So famous was this [...]

Lord Lieutenant

Lord Lieutenant

A Lord-Lieutenant is a personal representative for the British monarch in each county of the United Kingdom. Today Lord Lieutenancy is mostly a ceremonial position, but historically they were responsible for organising the county’s militia. The Lord Lieutenant is the highest rank of the lieutenants, followed by a Vice Lord Lieutenant and then Deputy Lieutenants. The Vice Lord Lieutenant takes over duties if the Lord Lieutenant is ill or unable to attend. There are usually between 30 to 40 Deputy Lieutenants appointed by the Lord Lieutenant depending on the county’s size. The main duties performed by a Lord Lieutenant are arranging visits for members of the royal family, as well as escorting royal visitors, presenting medals on behalf of the sovereign and participating in civic and social activities within the lieutenancy. The uniform worn by Lord Lieutenants is military in style and has many similarities with army uniforms. Currently Lord Lieutenants wear a dark blue uniform in the style of a General [...]

Tropping of the Colour 2016

Military Parade

A military parade is an organised formation of soldiers who restricted by close-order manoeuvring marching or ‘drilling’. Up until the late 19th century soldiers fought in formation, but in modern times the military parade is now entirely ceremonial. Sometimes a parade is performed to exhibit the military strength of a nation. The oldest and largest military parade in Europe is the Bastille Day Military Parade on the 14th of July in Paris during France’s national day celebrations. The terminology comes from close order formation combat where soldiers were held in strict formations to maximise their combat effectiveness. Military drills are performed to memorise certain actions, formations and movements. Recruits in modern armies are taught drills to show them how to work as a team while formations are also still used in riot control. There are four directions used in a parade: the Advance, the Retire, the Left and the Right. The Advance is the primary direction of movement and on a [...]

United Kingdom Special Air Service (SAS)

The Special Air Service (SAS) is the British Army’s most renowned United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) unit. Its motto is ‘Who Dares Wins’ and has become well known all over the world. The SAS was created by David Stirling in 1941 as a desert raiding regiment mainly for carrying out sabotage missions. During 1950 the unit was changed from a regiment to a corps. The SAS’ roles include counter terrorism, hostage rescue and covert reconnaissance. Currently the corps is made up of the 22 Special Air Service Regiment, the 21 Special Air Service Regiment (Reserve) and the 23 Special Air Service Regiment (Reserve). In order to become part of the Regiment, soldiers have to pass a number of exercises and tests during a five-week-long selection process. Although there are around 200 applicants each time, only 30 usually make it through. The first SAS mission was in 1941 and involved a parachute drop in support of the Operation Crusader offensive. This mission, due [...]