Textile Mill

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Dalton, Barton & Co Ltd.

Dalton Barton & Co was a textile manufacturing company founded near Coventry on the 16th of January 1852. The name Dalton and Barton corresponded with that of its two founding weavers: Robert Arnold Dalton and George Samuel Barton. Robert Dalton was born in 1825, the son of a plumber and glazier, but at the age of 14 he started a 7-year apprenticeship with William and John Sargent, who were ribbon makers in Coventry. In 1847 he became a ribbon manufacturer. Later in life he was elected an alderman and mayor of the city. Little is known of George Barton, only that he was a year younger than Robert Dalton. It wasn’t until 29th May 1872 that the company became a limited company. Dalton Barton & Co Ltd had an incorporated number of 6313, meaning that there were only 6312 incorporated companies before it so it was one of the first few. The company flourished and extended its range from ribbon making to narrow fabrics, braids, upholstery trimmings, uniform regalia and lanyards. The Company had a huge boost when it received the contract to produce Australian moquette tape used in railway carriages. Both the Coventry factory and its London marketing company continued to prosper and they became one of the largest haberdashery wholesalers in the world. In 1940 during WWII disaster struck when an air raid destroyed the whole Coventry factory. By this time the factory had focused all of its efforts on military narrow fabrics such a chevron lace, medal ribbon and parachute harnesses etc. This meant it was able to obtain Government funding to build a new factory on Mason Road, Coventry. As the war progressed, sourcing the pure silk for the weaving of medal ribbons became increasingly difficult. Nylon was suggested as an alternative - at the time it was a newly-developed material. King George VI refused stating that his award medals were for superior acts of gallantry which would be manufactured from only the finest materials. David Wright, father of Robin Wright, the present owner, joined the company in 1959. He had no experience of narrow fabrics but was skilled in textile manufacturing management and design. He joined the company and moved the factory near the river Wye in Gloucester, which is close to the Forest of Dean. David then renamed the company Wyedean Weaving. In 1964 a severance was proposed by Dalton Barton and its subsidiary Wyedean Weaving. David Wright struck a deal to transfer all of the haberdashery production looms, in exchange for him being allowed to purchase the military production machinery. Wyedean Weaving was relocated to Haworth, West Yorkshire where David grew up and focused its energies on uniform accoutrement such as sergeant sashes, chevrons, RAF rank braid and naval collar tape which was mainly sold to customers such as the Ministry of Defence. To view our range of narrow fabrics click here.

2021-03-30T15:47:41+01:0025 January 2018|

Sprang Weaving

Sprang is an ancient method of constructing fabric that gives it an appearance similar to netting so that it has natural elasticity. Sprang, unlike netting, however, is constructed from entirely warp threads. The sprang structure is close to a Leno weave but without the weft so that it is inherently flexible. Although examples of sprang can be seen back in the Bronze Age, there were no written records until the late nineteenth century. These days knitting has taken over sprang constructions, however, there are many examples in museums of product woven in a sprang construction which is often misidentified as knitted. Wyedean possesses a sprang fabric hand loom, which, to the best of our knowledge is one of only two in existence, the other we understand is in London owned by the Royal School of Needlework. Our loom hasn’t been used for many years and was last used in the 1980s to manufacture British Army Generals Guards Full Dress and Undress waist sash ribbons, also for Scottish Regiment Officers’ shoulder sash, all woven in pure silk and 2% gold threads. Unfortunately, these products were converted over to power loom production using synthetic threads in the late 1980s as a cost saving measure. To view our range of sashes click here.

2021-03-30T15:53:41+01:0017 October 2017|

David Wright Founder of Wyedean

Wyedean was formally founded on 7th April, 1964, by David Wright. Before starting his own business, David’s first job after leaving school was as an apprentice textile designer at Bridgehouse mill. Little did he know that 34 years later he would purchase the very same building. At the age of 18 and at the outbreak of the Second World War, David volunteered for the Royal Navy, specifically The Fleet Air Arm. After pilot training in Canada he qualified as a commissioned Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve fighter pilot and served with the now- Legendary Catapult Aircraft Merchant ships NAS (Naval Air Station). 804 Sailing from Belfast in 1941. This squadron provided Air reconnaissance from mid Atlantic to the Western approaches, in trying to protect the British desperately needed convoys from submarine attacks, which were being alerted by the long range German Focke Wulf Condors and causing terrible shipping losses. The Hurricane fighters would have been rocketed fromthe converted Merchant ships to engage in combat with the Condors. The successful or wounded aircraft would ditch in the sea, mostly too far from land. The Hurricane pilot had three minutes to get out before the plane sank, and he would hope to be rescued and not always, before hypothermia killed him. David survived many rocket launches, later becoming C.O. of NAS 702 for a time. During his later pilot career, in 1942-1943 he served in the Aircraft Carrier Formidable in 893 during the Mediterranean invasions of North Africa, Sicily and Italy. Wyedean was established in 1964 as a manufacturer of braid and uniform accoutrement. Previously the business was known as Dalton Barton. David joined Dalton Barton in 1959 and was taken on to introduce new blood to the company, to take a hard look at the firm and to move the business away from Coventry as it was proving increasingly difficult to compete for labour with the booming motor industry. New premises were found at Coleford between the River Wye and the Forest of Dean – which eventually inspired a new name: Wyedean Weaving. In 1964, David  bought from Dalton Barton the military side of the business manufacturing narrow fabrics and military ceremonial products. This decision started the process of turning Wyedean Weaving into the business it is today. He set out purchasing the appropriate machinery and moving the business to Haworth. From the early days of the business, David’s father, Frank Wright M.B.E. served as company director until his death in 1975. Frank was a textile machine designer who worked at Keighley’s Prince, Smith and Stell for over 40 years. He was awarded the M.B.E. in recognition of his inventing an entirely new yarn spinning technique called centrifugal spinning. Norma, David’s wife, has also been involved in the business for the last 50 years, serving first as Company Secretary and currently as Chairman. In fact, since 1964 there have been four generations of the Wright family working in the mill with three still actively involved. In his younger days, David enjoyed stunt [...]

2021-03-30T16:14:19+01:0011 July 2017|

Medal Ribbon

Medals, Military Orders and Decorations are given to members of the armed forces to recognise and celebrate their personal accomplishments. Medal bars or clasps can be attached to the ribbon to indicate the operation for which the recipient received the award. Multiple bars on the same medal are used to recognise multiple achievements. All military services use a common order of wear which basically dictates the order in which the recognised military decorations must be worn, and is shown below: 1.    The Victoria Cross and the George Cross 2.    United Kingdom Orders 3.    United Kingdom Decorations 4.    Order of St John (all classes) 5.    United Kingdom Medals for Gallantry and for Distinguished Service 6.    United Kingdom Operational Service Medals (including authorised United Nations Medals and Medals of other recognised International Organisations). Worn in order of date of award 7.    United Kingdom Polar Medals 8.    United Kingdom Police Medals for Valuable Service 9.    United Kingdom Jubilee, Coronation and Durbar Medals 10.    Long Service and Efficiency Awards 11.    Commonwealth Orders, Decorations and Medals instituted by the Sovereign. Worn in order of date of award. 12.    Commonwealth Orders, Decorations and Medals instituted since 1949 otherwise than by the Sovereign (including those of the States of Malaysia and the State of Brunei). Worn in order of date of award. 13.    Foreign Orders. If approved for wear, worn in order of date of award. 14.    Foreign Decorations. If approved for wear, worn in order of date of award. 15.    Foreign Medals. If approved for wear, worn in order of date of award. The most prestigious award in the United Kingdom honours system is the Victoria Cross (VC). The VC was introduced on 29th January 1856 by Queen Victoria to honour acts of valour during the Crimean War. Since then, the medal has been awarded to 1355 recipients who were awarded for gallantry ‘in the face of the enemy’. Only 11 medals have been awarded since the Second World War to members of the British Army. As the Victoria Cross is rare and so highly prized, the medal has sold for over £400,000 at auction. Lord Ashcroft had a collection containing over one-tenth of all Victoria Cross medals and now stands on public display in the Imperial War Museum. “A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured ribbon”  -Napoleon Bonaparte To View our range of medal ribbons click here.

2021-03-30T16:21:46+01:0015 February 2017|

Wyedean Weaving: Our Story

Wyedean Weaving was formally founded on 7 April, 1964, by David Wright. Before starting his own business, David’s first job after leaving school was an apprentice textile designer at Bridgehouse mill. Little did he know that 34 years later he would go onto purchase the very same building. At the age of 18, and at the outbreak of the Second World War, David volunteered for the Royal Navy, specifically The Fleet Air Arm. After pilot training in Canada he became a commissioned Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve fighter pilot and served with the now legendary Catapult Aircraft Merchant ships. Wyedean was established in 1964 as a manufacturer of braid and uniform accoutrement. Previously the business was known as Dalton Barton. David joined the company in 1959 and he was chosen to introduce new blood to the company, to take a hard look at the firm and to move the business away from Coventry as it was proving increasingly difficult to compete for labour with the booming motor industry. New premises were found at Coleford between the River Wye and the Forest of Dean – which eventually inspired a new name: Wyedean Weaving. By the early 1960s the market for narrow fabrics had grown considerably, yet it only served a hugely competitive and mainly domestic market; one in which a comparatively small business would be unlikely to survive for very long. Products such as carpet binding, curtain tape and safety harness webbing were in reasonable demand; however, there was also a call for military uniform narrow fabrics such as medal ribbon, rank braid, sergeant’s stripes and sashes. David realised that these products had the potential to be developed into a specialist range which could provide a small family company with a long-term future. They were unlikely to go out of fashion so long as Britain maintained a monarchy with military ceremonial requirements. So in 1964, David, by then a director of the company, struck a deal with the owners to take on the military side of the business. David immediately set about negotiating a purchase of the appropriate machinery and he was able to find suitable premises at Bridgehouse Mill, Haworth. From the early days of the business, David’s father, Frank Wright M.B.E. served as company director until his death in 1975. Frank was a textile machine designer who worked at Keighley’s Prince, Smith and Stell for over 40 years. He was awarded the M.B.E. in recognition of his inventing an entirely new yarn spinning technique called centrifugal spinning. Norma, David’s wife, has also been involved in the business for the last 50 years, serving first as Company Secretary and currently as Chairman. In fact, since 1964 there have been four generations of the Wright family working in the mill with three still actively involved. The family has fulfilled many diverse roles, from receptionist to managing director, and from loom-tuner to inspector. Robin Wright (David’s son) joined the company in 1979 and in 1990 became Managing Director. Robin oversaw the diversification of the company’s [...]

2021-03-30T17:22:07+01:008 July 2015|

Wyedean is to Appear in Every Parade

Wyedean's mission is ‘To appear in every parade’ a tall order for most in its trade, but this gives Wyedean plenty to work towards, particularly given its new international goals and ambitions through website development and overseas developments. The media is often full of national and international ceremonies and parades and Wyedean takes it in its stride to find video footage from these events so that it can ensure that it is either in these events, or that it can supply our uniforms and accessories for the next parade or ceremony All uniformed British serviceman will at least wear a badge or rank marking which has been produced by Wyedean. Every Policeman serving in the London Metropolitan Police Force will have their service numbers (letters and numerals) on their shoulder epaulettes which are also supplied by Wyedean. This makes Wyedean's products as prominent in the British market as any other around the globe. However, Wyedean continually aspires to make itself more recognisable in global markets by supplying its products internationally. A recent example of Wyedean's products being used world-wide can be seen on the image to the left. Ceremonial regalia worn as far away as the Kingdom of Tonga in the Oceania region. This gold and red sash made by Wyedean is worn by the King and Queen of Tonga. Wyedean is delighted to know that its items are being worn proudly on the other side of the world, thus making our mission look just that little bit more achievable. Wyedean is determined to make its mission a reality and following recent exhibitions in the United Arab Emirates, Wyedean is hoping to take its products as far as the Persian Gulf. Wyedean also appears in many British parades including the Changing of the Guards ceremony, from Scottish to Irish, and Coldstream to Grenadier. For many years, Wyedean has also appeared in the Trooping the Colour parade. All of the staff at Wyedean take great pride when they can watch back the footage and spot something that was hand-stitched in Wyedean's Haworth Mill. In more recent news, Wyedean's products played a big part in the Battle of Britain memorial, where many servicemen wore at least one item manufactured by Wyedean. This momentous event, marking the 75th Anniversary of the battle, saw the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, the Duke of Cambridge and other members of the Royal family appear on the balcony of Buckingham Palace to watch a flyover of four Spitfires, two Hurricanes and four Eurofighter Typhoons as part of an enhanced Changing of the Guard performed by the RAF Queen’s Colour Squadron. Wyedean's high quality military insignia, regalia and accoutrement appear in parades up and down the country on a daily basis. However, the success of the company will ultimately be measured by its international presence, something which Wyedean works towards on a daily basis.

2021-03-30T17:26:09+01:001 March 2015|

A Royal Visit: Princess Anne

2014 was a big year for Wyedean as it saw it celebrating 50 years of manufacturing in Haworth. To commemorate this special occasion, Wyedean received a royal visit from HRH Princess Anne on the 27th February 2015. This memorable event was greeted with open arms from the staff at Wyedean, who were most honoured to meet The Princess Royal. Princess Anne and many local dignitaries were given a guided tour of Wyedean, many of whom showed particular interest in the traditional textile mill from which Wyedean has operated for many years. The Princess Royal spoke knowledgably to Wyedean's Managing Director, Robin Wright and impressed with her enthusiasm and vast knowledge of Wyedean's products, many of which she has actually worn. Princess Anne expressed a particular interest in the saddlery items and hand embroidery. If you are interested to see more information from the royal visit. Check out the newspaper article in the Telegraph and Argus here.

2021-03-30T17:28:09+01:0028 February 2015|

Development Manufacture Supply

Development - Manufacture - Supply. Three words that are central to Wyedean's core business practices. Wyedean is not just a supplier of goods constantly churning out product after product. It's skilled and experienced team see products right through from the drafting and prototyping stage, to their manufacture, testing and final delivery to the customer. Wyedean constantly strives to maintain and improve its standards. Wyedean is ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 14001 accredited and also has Investors in People certification. Wyedean has a worldwide network of skilled, versatile suppliers who are trained to the top of their profession ready to supply the best quality product. Its contract management experts are ready to take on any challenge and its excellent administration and customer service teams are available for support. For contract or development enquiries, we suggest you visit Wyedean's corporate website at www.wyedean.com. The launch of Wyedean Stores sees Wyedean maintaining its upward trend and allows it to sell commercially to the general public, in addition to its core B2B (Business to Business) trading.

2021-03-30T17:26:31+01:002 February 2015|

Why Wyedean?

Wyedean was previously known as Dalton Barton, the names of two Coventry ribbon weavers: Robert Dalton and George Barton, who formed a partnership in 1851. This partnership later diversified into the manufacture of coach lace and upholstery trimmings and the company then won orders to supply the newly-formed Australian railways with tape to join moquette seat covering, which proved to be a great boost to the firm. David Wright joined the company in 1959 and was given the responsibility of further developing the business and increasing its product scope. His first major decision was a location change, moving the company away from Coventry where there was extremely high competition for labour. Newly situated in Coleford, Somerset, it was here where Dalton Barton was also rebranded as Wyedean Weaving. But many people ask - why Wyedean? Well, the new location at Coleford was situated between the River Wye and the Forest of Dean, thus inspiring - Wyedean Weaving. Of course the "Weaving" part of the company's name is self-explanatory. Fast forward a few years to 1964, and David, by then a director of the company, struck a deal with the owners and purchased part of the company. He again relocated the company to its current premises at Bridgehouse Mill, Haworth. The photo to the left shows the very first clocking in card, dated the week ending 25th of December 1964.

2021-03-30T17:27:07+01:001 February 2015|
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