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Six Military Units you never knew existed.

Classic military units differ in their specialization and size from country to country. Here are some Military Units you probably didn’t know existed. Lovat scouts (United Kingdom) Frederick Burnham, was the Commander of the Scottish Highland Regiment. He formed the Lovat Scouts in 1900 to fight in the Second Boer War. They became known as one of the first heavily camouflaged units during the First World War. Their suit, know are a Ghillie suit, was designed to resemble the background environment, such as sand or snow.  Most of the regiment’s soldiers were gamekeepers from big Scottish estates and were known for their shooting skills so not surprisingly, in 1916 the military unit became the British Army’s first sniper unit.  61st Cavalry Regiment (India) Formed in 1953, the 61st Cavalry Regiment is the largest cavalry regiment in the World that isn’t ceremonial and is fully operational. The Regiment is made up of 270 men and is the only regiment that reserves a third of its places for Kaim Khani Muslim soldiers. The Regiment took part in combat in 2001, when it was involved in Operation Parakram, which was a stand-off along the Indian Pakistani border.  ‘A’ Force (United Kingdom) The ‘A’ Force unit was set up by Dudley Wrangel Clarke during WWII and he was the only solder initially. He gave himself the task of deceiving the enemy by setting up fake regiments and operations. The unit was eventually given real mean to work behind the enemy lines. Filthy Thirteen (USA) The Filthy 13, or formally called, The Demolition Section, was made up of 18 paratroopers. These men were sent behind enemy lines to destroy and secure bridges following the Normandy landings in 1944. Most of their missions were seemingly suicidal. Many of them wore facepaint and were unwashed, hence the name. one of the soldiers said, “didn’t do everything we were supposed to do in some ways and did a whole lot more than they wanted us to do in other ways. We were always in trouble.” Fifteen of the eighteen men lived.  The ‘Underground Army’ (United Kingdom) Churchill set up the Auxiliary Units, incase Germany’s Operation Sea Lion had been a success, to provide resistance and overthrow the enemy. Although these men hid under the veil of the Home Guard, they were fully trained in guerrilla warfare, assassination and sabotage. There were 3500 men in the regiment who were recruited to be self-sufficient, in their small teams, and entirely autonomous. They lived in especially dug-out underground shelters. Many of these men joined the SAS at the war’s end.  Mormon Battalion (USA) The Mormon Battalion was the only religious regiment in the US. The battalion was made up of over 500 men, women, boys and girls. They never fought a single battle although marched 2000 miles across America, helping to play a part in the expansion of the US.

2021-03-30T14:53:37+01:0029 July 2019|

Textile Waste Recycled and given to Local Schools.

Wyedean currently bags up its waste yarn, material off-cuts and cones, and rather than processing it through traditional waste disposal methods recently delivered these to local schools for children to re-use.  Recent recipients of these materials were schools in Oldfield, Stanbury, Ingrow, Haworth, Oxenhope and Oakworth. The cones are used by school children for modelling while the materials and yarns are used for gluing and craft projects. We also donated 80 kilos to a school near Boroughbridge. Altogether Wyedean has donated and delivered over 250 cones and 200 kilos of textile waste.  Wyedean is now working towards a new target of distributing 100 kilos of waste amongst local schools per year.  Not only is this is a fun resource for local schools, but it’s also good for the environment as this waste would ordinarily be disposed of in landfill.

2021-03-30T15:01:37+01:005 February 2019|

Diver makes Great War Discovery and reunites family.

Roger Bennett, a police diver from the Yorkshire and Humber Regional Marine Unit, was searching for a murder weapon at the bottom of the River Loxley just to the North of Sheffield. During his dive he found what he first thought was an old coin, but when Mr Bennett resurfaced, realised he had actually found a medal. And with help from Clifton Park Museum in Rotherham determined that the medal belonged to Lance Corporal Stephen Smith the York and Lancaster Regiment. The young soldier fought in Gallipoli in Turkey on 2 July 1915 and died from wounds he received at Suvla bay on 9 August 2015. “I initially thought it was a coin, but as soon as I realised that it was medal I was amazed.  We quickly made the decision to attempt to reunite the medal with Stephen’s family. Our research started within hours of us finding it. We put a couple of photos on social media and the rest is history…” The family of Lance Corporal Smith got in touch after seeing pictures of the newly polished medal on Twitter and Roger added that: “We were thrilled to track down Stephen’s family and it was fantastic to learn more about his story, despite it being such a sad ending. I’m so pleased that we have been able to reunite them with such a precious and important part of their family history” Lance Corporal Smith’s family agreed to donate the medal to the Clifton Park after a genealogical search traced 22 living family members with some living as far away as Canada.Reverend Julian Cliff, who was Lance Corporal Smith’s great nephew, never knew his grandmother had any other family and the 22 family members met for the first time at the museum more than a century after Lance Corporal Smith’s death. Julian told the South Yorkshire Police “At first I thought it was a hoax, but once things started to fall in to place I was so grateful that Roger and the team had decided to find us. They went beyond the call of duty and they have brought a family together - most of us have never met before today.”

2021-03-30T15:01:58+01:0029 January 2019|

1914-1919 Roll of Honour War Memorial

War memorial almost lost forever as wartime researchers struggle to find it a new home.  The Roll of Honour was originally displayed at the Woodlands Lodge, Haworth, No185 (N) of the Grand United Order of Oddfellows Friendly Society for their fallen and served members in the Great War of 1914-1919. The memorial is a rectangular wooden board which has supporting pillars and a cornice. The Coat of Arms is at the top with the names of those who fell listed below it. The inscription reads “1914 Roll of Honour 1919/ Amicita Amor Et Veritas/ Members who have made the/ Supreme sacrifice.” Listed are the names of the 83 who served, 10 of whom sadly died and 73 who returned. The Regiments and Corps named on the Roll of Honour are listed below; - Army Ordinance Corps (AOC) - Army Service Corps (ASC) - Army Service Corps (motor transport) (ASC (mt)) - Coldstream Guards (CG) - Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding Regiment) (D of W (WR)) - Durham Light Infantry (DLI) - East Lancashire Regiment (EL) - East Yorkshire Regiment (EY) - King’s Liverpool Regiment (KL) - Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (KOYLI) - Labour Corps (Lab C) - Machine Gun Corps (MGC) - North Staffordshire Regiment (N. Staff) - Northumberland Fusiliers (NF) - Royal Air Force (RAF) - Royal Engineers (RE) - Royal Engineers Signals (RE Signals) - Royal Field Artillery (RFA) - Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) - Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) (BW (RH)) - Royal Scot’s Fusiliers (RSF) - Royal Scots (RS) - Royal Warwickshire Regiment (RW) - South Staffordshire Regiment (S. Staff) - The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) (SR) - West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales Own) (WY) - York and Lancaster Regiment (Y&L) - Yorkshire Hussars (YH) Measuring 2.2x2m finding a new home for the war memorial was not an easy task, including its relocation by which it was proudly carried down the main street to its new location as the van was too small. Transferred by The Men of Worth Project C.I.C. into the custodianship of The Wyedean Weaving Co. Ltd, who together with the War Memorials Trust jointly funded its repair and conservation. As suppliers of ceremonial parade wear and accoutrement to the UK Ministry of Defence, Wyedean is a perfect choice, also allowing it to stay in its hometown Haworth. Even though the Roll of Honour’s new location is only a few hundred yards away from its original site, it was Crest Regalia, a long term customer of Wyedean’s based on the Isle of Wight that read Men of Worth’s blog seeking a new home for the memorial and put Wyedean and Men of Worth in touch. Without this intervention the Roll of Honour may well have been lost, along with many other war memorials which cannot be rehoused and end up being discarded, lost, unloved or broken. Several of the family names listed on the Roll of Honour will be recognisable to many in the Keighley and the Worth Valley area. It is a tremendous memorial full of history, [...]

2021-03-30T15:42:56+01:0030 October 2018|

The order of precedence for the British Army

The divisions of the regular army of the British Army have an order of precedence which dictates the order in which these divisions parade, from right to left. The unit on the extreme right, usually the Household Cavalry, is generally the highest ranking unit. Army Reserve units and Militia take precedence over regular units but this does not include the Honourable Artillery Company and The Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers. • Household Cavalry • Royal Horse Artillery • Royal Armoured Corps • Corps of Royal Engineers • Royal Regiment of Artillery • Royal Corps of Signals • Infantry • Foot Guards • Line Infantry • The Rifles • Special Air Service • Army Air Corps • Special Reconnaissance Regiment • Royal Army Chaplains Department • Royal Logistic Corps • Royal Army Medical Corps • Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers • Adjutant General's Corps • Royal Army Veterinary Corps • Small Arms School Corps • Royal Army Dental Corps • Intelligence Corps • Royal Army Physical Training Corps • General Service Corps • Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps • Corps of Army Music • Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia) (Army Reserve) • Honourable Artillery Company (Although Army Reserve Regiments, they are included in the order of arms Regular Army) • Remainder of the Army Reserve • Royal Gibraltar Regiment • The Royal Bermuda Regiment The order of precedence for the Household Cavalry and Royal Armoured Corps dates back to when the regiments had numbers rather than names. The Household Division regiments are always listed first, as they are the most senior. Today, as many regiments have been formed through amalgamations of other regiments, the order of precedence is given to those with the more senior amalgamated units. An example of this is that the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, which is one of the youngest in the army, is ranked second in the line infantry order as it is a direct descendant of the 2nd Regiment of Foot.

2021-03-30T15:03:08+01:0023 October 2018|

The Invictus Games

The Invictus games are an international multi-sport event for Paralympic athletes. The first Invictus Games took place in 2014 in London. The event was created by Prince Harry so that wounded or injured armed service personnel or veterans can take part in sports. Sports at the event include sitting volleyball, wheelchair basketball and indoor rowing. The event was inspired by the Warrior Games in the US and was given its name ‘Invictus’ from the Latin word meaning undefeated. The second games opened on 8th May 2016 in Orlando while year’s games are set to be held in Toronto in September. Unlike previous years which were held at a single site, this year’s venue is set to be at multiple locations around the city. The Air Canada Centre will hold the opening and closing ceremonies. Other locations include Nathan Phillips Square, Ryerson’s Mattamy Athletic Centre and York Lions Stadium. There are 17 countries invited to take part in the Games. Afghanistan Australia Canada Denmark Estonia France Georgia Germany Iraq Italy Jordan Netherlands New Zealand Romania Ukraine UK US Wyedean manufactures the medal ribbon for the Invictus Games. The sunshine yellow medal ribbon is produced in bulk in our textile mill. The ribbon is 25mm wide and is a nylon/cotton composition. A total of 900 metres of the medal ribbon is being produced. We stock a variety of medal ribbons on our webstore. To view our range click here. Wyedean are specialists in manufacturing narrow fabrics. To view our full range click here.

2021-03-30T16:05:52+01:0010 July 2017|

HMS Queen Elizabeth is ready for Sea trials.

As Britain’s largest ever warship,  it’s been an anxious and exciting wait for the launch of HMS Queen Elizabeth as it finally left its dockyard in Rosyth to head out for sea trials. The 65,000 ton aircraft carrier squeezed through an exit with only 14 inch clearance on either side. After nearly a decade-long build, this marks the latest milestone for the Royal Navy’s Queen Elizabeth Class carriers, which have cost more than £6 billion pounds, the other being HMS Prince of Wales. One of the Royal Navy’s warships will be escorting HMS Queen Elizabeth while its commanders try out the North Sea and Moray Firth. Shore-based helicopters will also be on the lookout for any submarines trying to sneak a peek at Britain’s new warship. 1,000 sailors and contractors will be aboard testing the vessel for the next six weeks. 650 doors and hatches on the vessel have been checked for fire safety and to check they are water tight. Multiple crew members have spent hours carrying out training for fires, flooding and overboard personnel. The Royal Navy had not had an aircraft carrier since 2010 when HMS Ark Royal was scrapped. HMS Queen Elizabeth will not be sent on operations until 2021. The ship will move to its new home in Portsmouth after the summer where trials for planes and helicopters will take place the following summer. The flight deck on the aircraft carrier can carry up to 36 F-35B stealth jump jets. We stock the HMS Queen Elizabeth Ship Crests and Cap Tallies on our website. To view them click here.

2021-03-30T16:06:16+01:0027 June 2017|

Flag of the 45th Line

Ensign Charles Ewart was a Scottish soldier of the Royal North British Dragoons and is most famous for capturing the regimental eagle of the 45th Regiment of the Line flag at the Battle of Waterloo. The French Imperial Eagle was gilded bronze and fixed to the top of a staff carrying the standard of the French 45th Infantry Regiment. The imperial eagle is one of the most iconic objects from the Napoleonic period and was a symbol of pride and loyalty among French troops who would form the backbone of Napoleon’s newly-formed regime. On June 10th 1815, the 45eme de la Ligne received its new eagle which was carried into the Battle of Waterloo by Pierre Guillot, where it would, after a bloody and brutal battle, be famously captured by Ewart. This symbolic victory made Ewart a hero and this captured eagle is now kept in Edinburgh Castle as one of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards most prized honours. So famous was this victory, in fact, that the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards changed the design of their cap badge to show the eagle above a Waterloo banner on crossed rifles. Wyedean was recently commissioned by a customer, who owned a replica 45th Infantry Regiment flag and eagle which had faded over the years, to recreate the flag and bring the staff, eagle and standard back to its former glory. Supplied with the core components, Wyedean’s tailoring department recreated the flag using printed materials instead of the original hand embroidered materials and stitched the detailing to stop the flag ballooning and ensured the drape was correct. Wyedean are specialists in the manufacture of flags and standards and our tailoring department have the skills and expertise to take on bespoke commissions as well as restoration projects.

2021-03-30T16:15:07+01:0024 April 2017|

Military Parade

A military parade is an organised formation of soldiers who restricted by close-order manoeuvring marching or ‘drilling’. Up until the late 19th century soldiers fought in formation, but in modern times the military parade is now entirely ceremonial. Sometimes a parade is performed to exhibit the military strength of a nation. The oldest and largest military parade in Europe is the Bastille Day Military Parade on the 14th of July in Paris during France’s national day celebrations. The terminology comes from close order formation combat where soldiers were held in strict formations to maximise their combat effectiveness. Military drills are performed to memorise certain actions, formations and movements. Recruits in modern armies are taught drills to show them how to work as a team while formations are also still used in riot control. There are four directions used in a parade: the Advance, the Retire, the Left and the Right. The Advance is the primary direction of movement and on a parade square is determined by the position of the flags. The Retire is the opposite of the Advance. As the names would suggest, The Left is to the left of the advance and the Right is to the right of the advance. Only one person is in charge of the parade at a time. Soldiers have restricted movement during parades and in most stances any movement at all is disallowed. It has been known for soldiers to faint while on parade. In British Armies there is a specific order of precedence. •    Royal Horse Artillery •    Royal Armoured Corps •    Royal Regiment of Artillery •    Corps of Royal Engineers •    Royal Corps of Signals •    Infantry •    Foot Guards •    Line Infantry •    Rifles •    Special Air Service •    Army Air Corps •    Special Reconnaissance Regiment[2] •    Royal Army Chaplains Department •    Royal Logistic Corps •    Royal Army Medical Corps •    Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers •    Adjutant General's Corps •    Royal Army Veterinary Corps •    Small Arms School Corps •    Royal Army Dental Corps •    Intelligence Corps •    Royal Army Physical Training Corps •    General Service Corps •    Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps •    Corps of Army Music •    Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers (Militia) (Army Reserve) •    Honourable Artillery Company (Although Army Reserve Regiments, they are included in the order of arms Regular Army)[1] •    Remainder of the Army Reserve •    Royal Gibraltar Regiment •    The Royal Bermuda Regiment Some of the military parades or ceremonial events in the British Military Forces are: Trooping the Colour, Changing of the Guard, Remembrance Sunday, Beating Retreat, State Visits and the Opening of Parliament. Ceremonial duties and parades are an important part of Army history and tradition. All soldiers who undertake such roles are highly trained and play an important part in military operations worldwide. Ceremonial events take place all over the world but few are as high profile as those that draw tourists to London. Wyedean stock a variety of Ceremonial items on the website and many of our [...]

2021-03-30T16:19:30+01:003 April 2017|
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