Wyedean’s bespoke commissions

Wyedean is known mostly for manufacturing accessories and accoutrements for the Armed Forces around the world.  We are, occasionally asked to produce some specialist items too. The business once received an order from The Royal Jordanian Army which had a camel mounted ceremonial regiment. The order was for fringing to hang over the camels eyes, similar to false eyelashes. The purpose was to stop flies or sand irritating the camel’s eyes. Over the years the fringe has become more ornate for ceremonial purposes. We supply a wide range of headwear for use in many different applications; from the standard ceremonial peaked caps to cadet helmets and covers which we were commissioned to design, develop and test. We have also more recently manufactured the bespoke costume tea cup headwear for the famous Yorkshire Tea marching band. One of our newer products is the Kevlar webbing. This is a key component in protective, flame resistant clothing. The webbing is used by blue light services and is useful where protection is needed against physical, electrical, heat or chemical particulates. More recently our Kevlar webbing has been used  in circus’s around the world on juggling sticks which are set alight. As Wyedean is known for the manufacture of braids and tapes, we were asked to produce thousands of meters of binding tape/ bandages for the film The Mummy. The bandages were soaked in tea to achieve the desired effect. As well as tape used in films, Wyedean has also made a jute webbing used to lower coffins into graves and also a saltpeter-dipped touch cord for firing antique cannon used in salutes.  Wyedean’s skills are not just limited to military uniforms. A recent commission saw the company manufacture bespoke flying suits for a helicopter transport company.  The business was also commissioned by one of Michael Jackson’s costumiers to manufacture a military type of cord/ frogging to be stitched on to one of his jackets. The costumier told us that the costume would also have cooling installed by way of thin tubes of chilled liquid circulating within to help keep him cool during his performance.  Wyedean regularly take on bespoke commissions. Contact our sales team today to discuss your requirements.

2021-03-30T14:54:26+01:0020 June 2019|

Combat Stress- Bring Them Home.

A new campaign has been released by the veterans’ mental health charity ‘Combat Stress’. The aim of the campaign is to reveal the isolation experienced by veterans with trauma.  Combat Stress worked with Channel 4’s in-house creative agency to produce the short film ‘Combat Stress – Bring Them Home’.  Real life veterans feature in the film and show how mental health problems can leave former servicemen and women isolated. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common and can often leave them feeling withdrawn from their family and friends.  The Combat Stress charity helps veterans by providing specialist support and treatment to help them overcome mental health issues like anxiety and PTSD. Often they struggle as they relive their trauma on the battlefield through nightmares and anxiety.  The charity was founded on May 12th 1919 and have now been helping veterans for the past 100 years. When the First World War ended, thousands of returning servicemen, came back shell shocked and received little sympathy from the public. Veterans were either left to suffer alone or locked away in mental war hospitals.  The Combat Stress charity was founded to take a stand against the misunderstanding around mental health at that time. The charity began fundraising for recuperative homes for veterans where they could start to rebuild their lives.  In the last ten years, the demand for this service had almost doubled and is predicted to carry on rising.  Last year alone, the charity helped 3416 veterans.  If you’d like to donate to help veterans click here. https://youtu.be/6BZ_0zEIcm4

2021-03-30T14:54:45+01:0030 April 2019|

D-Day Anniversary

Each year, thousands of people, descend on Normandy in France to remember those who risked their lives in D-Day, Operation Overlord and the Battle of Normandy. This year celebrates the 75th anniversary of the tragic battle. The anniversary will be commemorated with military parades, fireworks, airdrops, concerts and military camp re-enactments. The 6th June 1944 marks the D-Day Landings and the Battle of Normandy commenced, where men from all over the world came to fight the Nazi regime. Around 156,000 American, British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches along a 50 mile stretch in Normandy. General Dwight Eisenhower was appointed commander of the Operation Overlord and he told the troops “You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you”. The amphibious invasions began at 6:30am and by the end of the day more than 4,000 Allied troops lost their lives. Thousands more were wounded or missing. By the end of August 1944, the Allies had reached Seine River and Paris was liberated. The Normandy invasion started the turn against the Nazis and by May 8th 1954 the Allies formally accepted the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany and Hitler committed suicide a week earlier on April 30th. In January 2018, the French Ministry of Culture announced the D-Day landing beaches to be included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. This will ensure the sites are preserved and will help to transmit the universal messages they represents. Since the tragic event, they have come to symbolize universal hopes for freedom and peace.

2021-03-30T15:01:24+01:0025 March 2019|

Diver makes Great War Discovery and reunites family.

Roger Bennett, a police diver from the Yorkshire and Humber Regional Marine Unit, was searching for a murder weapon at the bottom of the River Loxley just to the North of Sheffield. During his dive he found what he first thought was an old coin, but when Mr Bennett resurfaced, realised he had actually found a medal. And with help from Clifton Park Museum in Rotherham determined that the medal belonged to Lance Corporal Stephen Smith the York and Lancaster Regiment. The young soldier fought in Gallipoli in Turkey on 2 July 1915 and died from wounds he received at Suvla bay on 9 August 2015. “I initially thought it was a coin, but as soon as I realised that it was medal I was amazed.  We quickly made the decision to attempt to reunite the medal with Stephen’s family. Our research started within hours of us finding it. We put a couple of photos on social media and the rest is history…” The family of Lance Corporal Smith got in touch after seeing pictures of the newly polished medal on Twitter and Roger added that: “We were thrilled to track down Stephen’s family and it was fantastic to learn more about his story, despite it being such a sad ending. I’m so pleased that we have been able to reunite them with such a precious and important part of their family history” Lance Corporal Smith’s family agreed to donate the medal to the Clifton Park after a genealogical search traced 22 living family members with some living as far away as Canada.Reverend Julian Cliff, who was Lance Corporal Smith’s great nephew, never knew his grandmother had any other family and the 22 family members met for the first time at the museum more than a century after Lance Corporal Smith’s death. Julian told the South Yorkshire Police “At first I thought it was a hoax, but once things started to fall in to place I was so grateful that Roger and the team had decided to find us. They went beyond the call of duty and they have brought a family together - most of us have never met before today.”

2021-03-30T15:01:58+01:0029 January 2019|

Remembrance Day 2018

On Sunday the 11th of November 2018 at 11am the country will fall silent to remember those who fought for our country. This year Armistice Day and Remembrance Day fall on the same day, sometimes this day is also known more informally as Poppy Day. Each year veterans participate in the Cenotaph March Past at the Parade in Whitehall. The red poppy has become the symbol for Remembrance Sunday with poppy wreaths being laid at cenotaphs all over the country to commemorate Britain’s war dead. In more recent years there has been an increased appearance of the white poppy, a pacifist symbol of remembrance. White poppies, according to the Peace Pledge Union (PPU) represent remembrance for all victims of war, commitment to peace and a challenge to the glamorisation of conflict. The white poppy was produced in 1933 by the Women’s Co-operative Guild to symbolise ‘no more war’ and represents all victims of all wars. The red poppy appeal is organised by the Royal British Legion (RBL) and specifically represents remembrance associated with the British Armed Forces. There has been a long standing opposition to the white poppy, with critics suggesting that it undermines the message of remembrance around Armistice Day. However, St John’s Ambulance has changed its dress code policy to allow volunteers to wear the white poppy as an alternative. During the war when the soil was churned up by endless fighting, poppies still managed to flourish leading the red poppy to become a symbol of remembrance of the First World War. The poppy is also seen as a symbol to honour the millions of current servicemen and women who fight in our Armed Forces. Charities such as Blesma The Limbless Veterans also provide support to amputees from the Armed Forces. They currently help 1873 amputees who lost limbs in the line of duty. Every year a member of Wyedean attends the local service in Haworth to lay a wreath to honour those who have fallen. Which service will you be attending this year? Will you hold a two minutes silence at 11am? Listen out on Sunday for the half muffled church bells. To make a donation to the Poppy Appeal visit the British Legion website here: http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/

2021-03-30T15:06:25+01:0030 October 2018|

HMS Pickle

There have so far been eight ships named HMS Pickle in the Royal Navy. The most recent being an Algerine-class minesweeper which was launched in 1943. The original HMS Pickle was launched in the 1800s and was a 10-gun topsail schooner. The ship was present at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, under John Richards’ Lapenotiere, but was unfortunately wrecked in 1808. During the Battle of Trafalgar, HMS Pickle was too small to fight but was given the honour of being the first ship to bring the news of Nelson’s victory to Great Britain. In 1995, five replica Baltic packet schooners were constructed. In 2005 one was renamed ‘Schooner Pickle’ and although not a replica of HMS Pickle, this ship took part in the 200 year Trafalgar celebration. Currently the ship is at Hull Marina on the Humber and is kept as a representation of the original Pickle. The anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar is on the 21st October. If you wish to purchase your HMS Pickle cap tally click here.

2021-03-30T15:04:13+01:004 October 2018|

How to wear your Medals

The British Armed Forces recognise outstanding personal achievements by giving individuals from the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force and British Army various awards and decorations. Medals, ribbons and emblems awarded by HM The Queen are only permitted to be worn by the recipient. Whether friend or family, wearing someone else’s awards is classed as fraud. Ribbons can be worn without the medals themselves, apart from The Orders of the Garter and Thistle. Ribbons are to be worn over the left breast pocket button in the centre of the pocket. The ribbons are worn in rows with the most senior medal worn nearest the jacket lapel or front buttons, and in the top row if multiple rows are worn. The number of ribbons worn in a row depends on the width of the breast pocket, however, if the uniform has no breast pocket then the number of ribbons worn must be no more than five. If there is an incomplete row of ribbons, and there are already two or more rows worn, then the top row must be left incomplete and must be worn centrally. Each row of ribbons should be approximately 3 mm apart. Ribbons worn are to be stitched to the garment instead of mounted. Orders, decorations and medals are to be worn using an unseen brooch and on the left breast. If wearing a Full Dress tunic then they are usually placed in the middle, between the first and second buttons from the collar. Medals should be worn to show the Sovereign’s head. Orders, Decorations and Medals are to be worn at the following occasions: - State Occasions - Royal Occasions - Guards in London - Military Funerals - Guards on Royal residences - Guards of honour - Guards in Edinburgh - Ceremonial and Sovereign’s parades - Parades incorporating a religious service Orders, Decorations and Medals are worn on Full Dress, Frockcoat and No 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10 and 11 Dress. They are not to be worn on greatcoats and No 8 Combat Dress. Orders, Decorations and Medals are also not to be worn on operational or protective clothing. To view our range of medals and medal ribbons click here.

2021-03-30T15:17:06+01:0021 August 2018|

Mine Counter-Measure Vessels

During the 1990s the Royal Navy had two classes of off-shore patrol vessels: Island-class and Castle-class. In 1997, however, these were replaced by River-class which featured much larger vessels. The largest patrol vessel is HMS Protector which is a dedicated Antarctic patrol ship. There are also mine counter-measure vessels currently in service, including: the Sandown-class mine-hunters and the Hunt-class vessels. Hunt-class vessels have mechanical devices known as ‘sweeps’ used for disabling mines, while modern ships are soundproofed to reduce the chances of detonating the mines. Minesweeper vessels differ considerably to minehunter vessels. While minehunter vessels detect and neutralise mines, minesweepers clear open waters containing large numbers of mines.  Both vessels are formally referred to as mine counter-measure vessels (MCMV). There are various Royal Navy bases for the Mine Counter-Measures Squadron. HM Naval Base Clyde and Faslane are two of them. The First mine Counter-Measures Squadron (MCM1) recently received the Surface Flotilla Efficiency Trophy for keeping sea lanes safe from mines. When operating overseas, the UK’s Mine Counter-Measures forces are supported by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA). Usually ships spend three years on deployment and the crew changes every six months. At the end of the three year period the ships swap and another vessel takes over.

2021-03-30T15:17:28+01:007 August 2018|

Military Funerals

A military funeral is a memorial given by the military for a serviceman who died in battle, a veteran or prominent military figures. A military funeral may include the firing of a volley of shots as a salute, drumming, a flag draped over the coffin or a guard of honour. In British Army military funerals, reserved arms are carried and the Last Post and Rouse of Reveille are sounded. Any Service personnel who died while serving are entitled to a private funeral or a funeral at public expense. Generally, there is no ceremonial at a private funeral. This normally depends on the next of kin in conjunction with the unit. Military funerals take place with some or all military honours depending on the circumstances. Any salutes of guns are fired after the body has been laid to rest. The Military honours are: - Bearer Party - Pall - Bearers - Insignia Bearers - Escort and Firing Party of Gun Salute - Musical support - Minute Guns Personnel who have served in all ranks are entitled to funeral honours at the public expense. This is providing that the troops involved are stationed within reasonable distance. Coffins used in military funerals are draped with a Union Jack flag.

2021-03-30T15:17:56+01:007 June 2018|

High Sheriffs

A High Sheriff is a ceremonial officer appointed to each county of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The Office of High Sheriff is a non-political Royal appointment lasting for a single year. The role dates back to Saxon times, when the ‘Shire Reeve’ was responsible for the maintenance of law and order within the county. High Sheriffs are the oldest secular Office in the UK after the Crown. Today there are 55 High Sheriffs serving the counties in England and Wales. Supporting the Crown is still one of their central roles, but they also lend support to crime prevention agencies, emergency services and the voluntary sector. Each year three nominations are made in a meeting of the Lords of the Council in the Queen’s Bench Division of the High Court of Justice. Every March the meeting of the Privy Council takes place where the Sovereign selects the High Sheriffs. This is known as the ancient custom of ‘pricking’. Male High Sheriffs wear a ceremonial uniform called Court Dress. It is the same uniform worn since the late seventeenth century. The black or dark blue velvet coat is worn with a cocked hat, sword and shoes with cut steel buckles. Some High Sheriffs wear their military uniform instead of Court Dress. Ladies wear a style of uniform adapted from the traditional men’s Court Dress to suit their needs. When not in uniform A High Sheriff wears a badge of Office on a ribbon.

2021-03-30T15:18:44+01:0016 April 2018|
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