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Six Military Units you never knew existed.

Classic military units differ in their specialization and size from country to country. Here are some Military Units you probably didn’t know existed. Lovat scouts (United Kingdom) Frederick Burnham, was the Commander of the Scottish Highland Regiment. He formed the Lovat Scouts in 1900 to fight in the Second Boer War. They became known as one of the first heavily camouflaged units during the First World War. Their suit, know are a Ghillie suit, was designed to resemble the background environment, such as sand or snow.  Most of the regiment’s soldiers were gamekeepers from big Scottish estates and were known for their shooting skills so not surprisingly, in 1916 the military unit became the British Army’s first sniper unit.  61st Cavalry Regiment (India) Formed in 1953, the 61st Cavalry Regiment is the largest cavalry regiment in the World that isn’t ceremonial and is fully operational. The Regiment is made up of 270 men and is the only regiment that reserves a third of its places for Kaim Khani Muslim soldiers. The Regiment took part in combat in 2001, when it was involved in Operation Parakram, which was a stand-off along the Indian Pakistani border.  ‘A’ Force (United Kingdom) The ‘A’ Force unit was set up by Dudley Wrangel Clarke during WWII and he was the only solder initially. He gave himself the task of deceiving the enemy by setting up fake regiments and operations. The unit was eventually given real mean to work behind the enemy lines. Filthy Thirteen (USA) The Filthy 13, or formally called, The Demolition Section, was made up of 18 paratroopers. These men were sent behind enemy lines to destroy and secure bridges following the Normandy landings in 1944. Most of their missions were seemingly suicidal. Many of them wore facepaint and were unwashed, hence the name. one of the soldiers said, “didn’t do everything we were supposed to do in some ways and did a whole lot more than they wanted us to do in other ways. We were always in trouble.” Fifteen of the eighteen men lived.  The ‘Underground Army’ (United Kingdom) Churchill set up the Auxiliary Units, incase Germany’s Operation Sea Lion had been a success, to provide resistance and overthrow the enemy. Although these men hid under the veil of the Home Guard, they were fully trained in guerrilla warfare, assassination and sabotage. There were 3500 men in the regiment who were recruited to be self-sufficient, in their small teams, and entirely autonomous. They lived in especially dug-out underground shelters. Many of these men joined the SAS at the war’s end.  Mormon Battalion (USA) The Mormon Battalion was the only religious regiment in the US. The battalion was made up of over 500 men, women, boys and girls. They never fought a single battle although marched 2000 miles across America, helping to play a part in the expansion of the US.

2021-03-30T14:53:37+01:0029 July 2019|

The Kings Royal Hussars

The King’s Royal Hussars are a regiment with cavalry traditions and an interesting history. The King’s Royal Hussars were established in 1992, however the four original cavalry regiments which make up the modern King’s Royal Hussars have a long history of service with their own customs and traditions.  The origins of the regiment stretch right back to 1715 when the 10th, 11th and 14th Hussars were raised to serve in the two Jacobite Rebellions. In 1854 the 11th Hussars took part in the infamous Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimea campaign. The various regimens went through numerous changes over the years culminating in 1992 with the merging of the Royal Hussars and the 14th/20th Hussars into the Kings Royal Hussars we see today. The regiment is located at Aliwal Barracks in Tidworth, they are experts in operating a range of armored vehicles including the Challenger 2 battle tank which is used to support troops on close combat operations and the Scimitar reconnaissance vehicle which are used as scout vehicles ahead of the main troop. Overall their job is to form aggressive action against any enemy targets using their armoured vehicles. Their skills include; reconnaissance, conducting patrols, close combat, shock action and surveillance.  We stock a variety of the Regiment's badges. Click here to view the range.

2021-03-30T14:53:49+01:0016 July 2019|

Military Sword Belt Ensembles

Sword belts in the military are worn around the waist, their purpose being to hold a ceremonial sword. There are various styles of belts available, some which ore worn over the tunic, such as the Sam Browne, the RAF Officers and the Naval Officers.  Sword belts can have several components; as well as the waist belt, there are also sword slings, or a sword frog for retaining the scabbard. Often there is a shoulder belt worn with the ensemble to prevent the weight of the sword pulling down the belt. This can also, be achieved by the belts being held in place by hooks on the tunic. Swords can be worn in two positions, raised or hooked up, where the scabbard or frog is attached to a hook to raise the sword to stop it trailing. Alternatively, they can be worn down hanging from the slings or the frog. Sword belt ensembles can be made from a number of materials, but are primarily made from leather, webbing, PVC, or a combination.  Sword belt styles differ by the individual services and also often by rank or regiment. 

2021-03-30T14:53:56+01:009 July 2019|

Military Colours

Military colours, standards or guidons are carried to act as a rallying point for troops and to mark the location of the commander.  During the High Middle Ages, it became a regular practice to have their commander’s coat of arms on their standards.  It was decided that during the chaos of battle, the soldiers needed to be able to determine which their regiment was. Regimental flags were awarded by the head of state and were inscribed with the names of battles of other symbols representing achievements. They were treated with honour.  It became considered a great feat of arms if the enemy’s standard was captured. Colour Guards were enlisted to protect their colours. These were often elite soldiers. If the colours are ever in jeopardy of being captured by the enemy, they must be destroyed.  The Colour Guards are a group of soldiers assigned to protect the regimental colours. This duty is usually carried out by a young officer as it is considered so prestigious and experiences non-commissioned officers are assigned to the protection of the flag. The NCO’s re usually armed with either rifles or sabres to protect the colour.   When standing orders become too old to use they are never destroyed, but laid up in museums or places of significance to the regiment. In more modern battles, colours are no longer carried into battle due to the changes in tactics. They are still used at events.  In the United Kingdom the infantry regiments of the Army carry two colours which together are called a stand. These are two large flags which are mounted on a half pike with the regiments insignia placed in the centre.   The Rifle regiments traditionally do not carry colours. The two rifle regiments in the British Army; The Rifles and the Royal Gurkha Rifles carry their battle honours on their drums. In place of Regimental colours, the Gurkhas carry the Queen’s Truncheon.  The Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force also have colours. The Royal Navy colours consist of a White Ensign with a Union Jack and a Masthead pennant. Unlike the colours of regiments in the Army, every colour of the Royal Navy is identical. Units in the Royal Navy to hold a Queen’s colour are-  - Naval Aviation Command - Submarines Command- Fleet -Britannia Royal Naval College - Surface Flotilla - Royal Naval Reserve.  The Royal Air Force colours are made from sky blue silk and the Royal Cypher with a crown above is in the middle. 

2021-03-30T14:54:06+01:001 July 2019|

Armed Forces Day 2019

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] Every year Armed Forces day is celebrated to show support for the men and women who make up our Armed Forces community. This can include veterans, cadets and current serving troops and their families. Each year, on the last Saturday in June, Armed Forces Day takes place. This year it will take place on Saturday the 29th of June. The flag is raised on Monday 24th June on buildings and famous landmarks around the country. The National Event will be held in Salisbury this year, and in Scarborough in 2020 although local events happen all over the country to celebrate. Reserves Day also takes place on the 26th June. Each year, on this day, reservists wear their uniform in their regular civilian life. Reservists are often unrecognized so Reserves Day was created to highlight the valuable contribution the Reservists make to our Armed Forces. Armed Forces Day not only boosts morale for the troops, but allows the public to find out more about the forces. #SaluteOurForces is an easy way for anyone to pay tribute to the British Forces. The UK Armed Forces work around the world delivering aid, promoting peace, providing security and fighting terrorism. Will you be supporting Armed Forces Day? Find your local events here   [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

2021-03-30T14:54:15+01:0025 June 2019|

Wyedean’s bespoke commissions

Wyedean is known mostly for manufacturing accessories and accoutrements for the Armed Forces around the world.  We are, occasionally asked to produce some specialist items too. The business once received an order from The Royal Jordanian Army which had a camel mounted ceremonial regiment. The order was for fringing to hang over the camels eyes, similar to false eyelashes. The purpose was to stop flies or sand irritating the camel’s eyes. Over the years the fringe has become more ornate for ceremonial purposes. We supply a wide range of headwear for use in many different applications; from the standard ceremonial peaked caps to cadet helmets and covers which we were commissioned to design, develop and test. We have also more recently manufactured the bespoke costume tea cup headwear for the famous Yorkshire Tea marching band. One of our newer products is the Kevlar webbing. This is a key component in protective, flame resistant clothing. The webbing is used by blue light services and is useful where protection is needed against physical, electrical, heat or chemical particulates. More recently our Kevlar webbing has been used  in circus’s around the world on juggling sticks which are set alight. As Wyedean is known for the manufacture of braids and tapes, we were asked to produce thousands of meters of binding tape/ bandages for the film The Mummy. The bandages were soaked in tea to achieve the desired effect. As well as tape used in films, Wyedean has also made a jute webbing used to lower coffins into graves and also a saltpeter-dipped touch cord for firing antique cannon used in salutes.  Wyedean’s skills are not just limited to military uniforms. A recent commission saw the company manufacture bespoke flying suits for a helicopter transport company.  The business was also commissioned by one of Michael Jackson’s costumiers to manufacture a military type of cord/ frogging to be stitched on to one of his jackets. The costumier told us that the costume would also have cooling installed by way of thin tubes of chilled liquid circulating within to help keep him cool during his performance.  Wyedean regularly take on bespoke commissions. Contact our sales team today to discuss your requirements.

2021-03-30T14:54:26+01:0020 June 2019|

Household Cavalry set to move from Windsor

The Household Cavalry Regiment, who are made up of the Blues and Royals Regiment and the Life Guards Regiment, have been based in Windsor for more than 200 years. Over 250 soldiers marched through the town to mark their departure to Bulford Camp in Wiltshire on Salisbury Plain. The parade included marching troops, mounted troops and the Band of the Household Cavalry and started at Combermere Barracks and headed to Guildhall for a salute.  The Princess Royal addressed The Household Cavalry and their families. The Welsh Guards will be taking over the Combermere barracks. This is all part of a major restructuring  of the British Army.

2021-03-30T14:54:37+01:0021 May 2019|

Combat Stress- Bring Them Home.

A new campaign has been released by the veterans’ mental health charity ‘Combat Stress’. The aim of the campaign is to reveal the isolation experienced by veterans with trauma.  Combat Stress worked with Channel 4’s in-house creative agency to produce the short film ‘Combat Stress – Bring Them Home’.  Real life veterans feature in the film and show how mental health problems can leave former servicemen and women isolated. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common and can often leave them feeling withdrawn from their family and friends.  The Combat Stress charity helps veterans by providing specialist support and treatment to help them overcome mental health issues like anxiety and PTSD. Often they struggle as they relive their trauma on the battlefield through nightmares and anxiety.  The charity was founded on May 12th 1919 and have now been helping veterans for the past 100 years. When the First World War ended, thousands of returning servicemen, came back shell shocked and received little sympathy from the public. Veterans were either left to suffer alone or locked away in mental war hospitals.  The Combat Stress charity was founded to take a stand against the misunderstanding around mental health at that time. The charity began fundraising for recuperative homes for veterans where they could start to rebuild their lives.  In the last ten years, the demand for this service had almost doubled and is predicted to carry on rising.  Last year alone, the charity helped 3416 veterans.  If you’d like to donate to help veterans click here. https://youtu.be/6BZ_0zEIcm4

2021-03-30T14:54:45+01:0030 April 2019|

The Grenadier Guards

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] The Grenadier Guards have been active since 1656 and are one of the British Army’s most iconic and oldest regiments. The members of the Regiment are renowned for their determination, loyalty and grit.  Since its formation over 360 years ago, the Regiment, then named the Royal Regiment of Guards, has fought in all major battles in which the UK has been involved.  Specializing in Light Role Infantry, they often use light vehicles such as quad bikes. They have to be fast and mobile and ready to deploy anywhere in the world at short notice. Their dual roles; serving on the battlefield and providing precision whilst carrying out ceremonial duties in London and Windsor Castle.  The training of a Grenadier Guard is, at the beginning versatile. Once they have completed basic training, they can specialize as a Sniper, Reconnaissance Operator, Machine Gunner or other roles including logistical support and guarding royal palaces.  Past deployments include; Operation Herrick and Operation Telic. Currently they are training for Operation Shader, Operation Trenton and Operation Toral which are all in either South Sudan, Afghanistan or Iraq.  Their motto is ‘Honi soit qui mal y pense’ which means 'Shame to him who thinks evil of it,' popularly rendered as ‘Evil be to him who evil thinks’ and are recognized for their white plume on the left side of their bearskin cap.  View our range of Grenadier Guards uniform accessories here.  [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

2021-03-30T14:54:55+01:0025 April 2019|

The Royal Lancers

Queen Elizabeths’ own Royal Lancers are the armored cavalry regiment of 12 Armored Infantry Brigade. Their motto is ‘Death or Glory’ and their famous skull and crossbones cap badge is one of the most recognizable. The regiment is located in North Yorkshire at Catterick Garrison. They have been active from the 2nd of May 2015 and they specialize in reconnaissance. The soldiers in the Royal Lancers are also trained to fight enemy combatants using a wide range of equipment. The equipment they use mainly include Sharpshooter rifles, machine guns, mortars and anti-task missiles. The Royal Lancers main role is to provide a continuous stream of accurate information to commanders so they can make tactical decisions.  Although they have been active since 2015, their history stretches back more than 300 years. In 1715, the 9th and 12th Regiments of Dragoons were raised and the union of several historical lancer regiments. In 1993 The Queen’s Royal Lancers was formed and in 2015 the 9th/12th Royal Lancers and the Queen’s Royal Lancers joined to form The Royal Lancers. In 2017 the Queen granted the Regiment its title of ‘Queen Elizabeths’ Own’ meaning that their Colonel-in-Chief is HM The Queen. To view our range of The Royal Lancers products click here.

2021-03-30T14:55:05+01:008 April 2019|
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