The Rifles

The Rifles is the largest British Army infantry regiment. There are a wide range of jobs in the regiment, which, unlike any other regiment in the infantry, are a three hour travelling time from anywhere in the UK. The regiment was formed in 2007 as a result of the Future Army Structure and is made up of five Regular and two Reserve battalions. Since the formation of the regiment, it has been involved in many combat operations such as the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan. The Band and Bugles of The Rifles was formed by renaming the Band and Bugles of the Light Division. This then formed the band for The Rifles. The Buglers are selected from the regular battalions and are trained to play the bugle and a fast march of 140 paces per minute. A private soldier in a rifle regiment is known as a Rifleman and Sergeant, which is spelt in the archaic fashion. The founding regiments have each contributed to the ceremonial uniform today. The black buttons are worn on all forms of the rifles dress, except the combat and the bugle horn badge of the Light Infantry is worn on the cap badge. The Maltese Cross of the Royal Green Jackets is worn as a buckle on the cross belt and the French Croix de Guerre ribbon is worn on both sleeves of the No. 1 and No. 2 dress. The Rifles hold 913 battle honours, including 117 Victoria Crosses. The regimental motto is ‘swift and bold’ and the ‘Rifles’ name is broken down to stand for: Respect, Independence, Friends for Life, Learning, Excitement and Success. To view our range of uniform accessories for The Rifles click here.

2021-03-30T15:15:57+01:0013 September 2018|

How to wear your Medals

The British Armed Forces recognise outstanding personal achievements by giving individuals from the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force and British Army various awards and decorations. Medals, ribbons and emblems awarded by HM The Queen are only permitted to be worn by the recipient. Whether friend or family, wearing someone else’s awards is classed as fraud. Ribbons can be worn without the medals themselves, apart from The Orders of the Garter and Thistle. Ribbons are to be worn over the left breast pocket button in the centre of the pocket. The ribbons are worn in rows with the most senior medal worn nearest the jacket lapel or front buttons, and in the top row if multiple rows are worn. The number of ribbons worn in a row depends on the width of the breast pocket, however, if the uniform has no breast pocket then the number of ribbons worn must be no more than five. If there is an incomplete row of ribbons, and there are already two or more rows worn, then the top row must be left incomplete and must be worn centrally. Each row of ribbons should be approximately 3 mm apart. Ribbons worn are to be stitched to the garment instead of mounted. Orders, decorations and medals are to be worn using an unseen brooch and on the left breast. If wearing a Full Dress tunic then they are usually placed in the middle, between the first and second buttons from the collar. Medals should be worn to show the Sovereign’s head. Orders, Decorations and Medals are to be worn at the following occasions: - State Occasions - Royal Occasions - Guards in London - Military Funerals - Guards on Royal residences - Guards of honour - Guards in Edinburgh - Ceremonial and Sovereign’s parades - Parades incorporating a religious service Orders, Decorations and Medals are worn on Full Dress, Frockcoat and No 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10 and 11 Dress. They are not to be worn on greatcoats and No 8 Combat Dress. Orders, Decorations and Medals are also not to be worn on operational or protective clothing. To view our range of medals and medal ribbons click here.

2021-03-30T15:17:06+01:0021 August 2018|

Medal Ribbon

Medals, Military Orders and Decorations are given to members of the armed forces to recognise and celebrate their personal accomplishments. Medal bars or clasps can be attached to the ribbon to indicate the operation for which the recipient received the award. Multiple bars on the same medal are used to recognise multiple achievements. All military services use a common order of wear which basically dictates the order in which the recognised military decorations must be worn, and is shown below: 1.    The Victoria Cross and the George Cross 2.    United Kingdom Orders 3.    United Kingdom Decorations 4.    Order of St John (all classes) 5.    United Kingdom Medals for Gallantry and for Distinguished Service 6.    United Kingdom Operational Service Medals (including authorised United Nations Medals and Medals of other recognised International Organisations). Worn in order of date of award 7.    United Kingdom Polar Medals 8.    United Kingdom Police Medals for Valuable Service 9.    United Kingdom Jubilee, Coronation and Durbar Medals 10.    Long Service and Efficiency Awards 11.    Commonwealth Orders, Decorations and Medals instituted by the Sovereign. Worn in order of date of award. 12.    Commonwealth Orders, Decorations and Medals instituted since 1949 otherwise than by the Sovereign (including those of the States of Malaysia and the State of Brunei). Worn in order of date of award. 13.    Foreign Orders. If approved for wear, worn in order of date of award. 14.    Foreign Decorations. If approved for wear, worn in order of date of award. 15.    Foreign Medals. If approved for wear, worn in order of date of award. The most prestigious award in the United Kingdom honours system is the Victoria Cross (VC). The VC was introduced on 29th January 1856 by Queen Victoria to honour acts of valour during the Crimean War. Since then, the medal has been awarded to 1355 recipients who were awarded for gallantry ‘in the face of the enemy’. Only 11 medals have been awarded since the Second World War to members of the British Army. As the Victoria Cross is rare and so highly prized, the medal has sold for over £400,000 at auction. Lord Ashcroft had a collection containing over one-tenth of all Victoria Cross medals and now stands on public display in the Imperial War Museum. “A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured ribbon”  -Napoleon Bonaparte To View our range of medal ribbons click here.

2021-03-30T16:21:46+01:0015 February 2017|

The Military Medal Ribbon

The Military Medal (MM), created by King George V in March 1916, was a way to acknowledge the acts of bravery in war which were not considered worthy enough to receive a Distinguished Conduct Medal.  Warrant officers, non-commissioned officers, and men on the recommendation of a Commander in Chief in the field were awarded this medal. During WWI, 108 members of the Royal Newfound Regiment received the Military Medal. A silver bar was also given out to eight of these recipients which signified subsequent acts of bravery. The Military Medal is shown below feturing a picture of the sovereign. In the First World War this medal depicted a bare-headed King George V in a Field Marshall’s uniform. The reverse of the medal reads “For Bravery in the Field”, circled by a laurel wreath with the Royal Cypher and Imperial Crown on top. The medal is displayed on a dark blue ribbon with red and white stripes. It is this medal ribbon which was made by Wyedean, formally known as Dalton Barton. Notes for this order are shown in the bottom right image. Quotations and sample production took place in 1916. The top middle image with the ribbon design features King George V initials – G.R.I which stands for “George Rex Imperator”. Ribbon delivery to the War Office, now known as the Ministry of Defence (MoD), would commence 10 to 14 days after 2nd March 1916. The Dalton Barton factory was bombed during the WWII Coventry blitz on the 15th November 1940. The factory was destroyed along with all its archives, hence we have no records whatsoever dating prior to the air raid – except these. It is noted in the letters from Buckingham Palace that the medals, produced by The Royal Mint, would take much longer to make. The King instructs that recipients of the award should receive the ribbon ahead of the medal – most likely because he knew that many were badly wounded and were unlikely to survive long enough to receive the medal itself. “A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of coloured ribbon” – Napoleon Bonaparte, July 1815.

2021-03-30T17:20:04+01:0022 October 2015|

What is a Cap Tally?

As a new customer to this website you might be wondering what is a cap tally and how and when it may be worn? A cap tally is a black nylon ribbon, bearing the name of a ship or other establishment to which the wearer belongs. They are conventionally black with yellow or gold inscription and tallies are commonly worn by sailors in the Royal Navy and are worn with working dress, active dress and formal dress. Tying a cap tally can prove extremely difficult for a novice. They are wrapped around the hat with the inscription central to the white cap, then tied in a bow on the left hand side of the cap. There are many tutorials on getting this process correct and to see how to tie the perfect cap tally, watch this short clip of a sea cadet below. Wyedean's Cap tallies are available for many different ship names and establishments. Shop now to view our wide array of high quality cap tallies, manufactured to Ministry of Defence standards.

2021-03-30T17:24:21+01:0016 May 2015|
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