Remembrance Sunday and Armistice Day Celebrations.

Every year we as a nation unite to remember those who have fallen fighting for our country. This year celebrations will be a little different due to Covid. The annual Remembrance Sunday March past at the Cenotaph, where up to 10,000 War Veterans take part in London did not take place this year. The ceremony was still broadcast live on BBC1 at 10:15am. The closed ceremony was attended by the likes of The Prime Minister and Members of The Royal Family. Attendees laid Poppy wreaths at the Cenotaph.  Armistice Day 2020 will take place on Wednesday 11th November. On November 11th 1918 the armistice was signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany. This stated an end to any conflict and an end to the war. This was signed at 11am, “on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.” In many of the Allied nations, and France, this is a national holiday.  All over the world people stop to observe a two minutes silence at 11am on the 11th of November. Poppies are worn as a symbol of respect and a tribute to those who fell during the Wars.  Socially distanced ceremonies took place on Sunday on a much smaller scale due to Covid. The local councils advised much smaller outdoor ceremonies. We are advised to keep numbers down to those wishing to lay wreaths. Buglers are able to perform outdoors. Any communal singing must be outdoors and is limited to the national anthem and one additional song.

2021-03-30T14:41:22+01:0011 November 2020|

Remembrance Day 2018

On Sunday the 11th of November 2018 at 11am the country will fall silent to remember those who fought for our country. This year Armistice Day and Remembrance Day fall on the same day, sometimes this day is also known more informally as Poppy Day. Each year veterans participate in the Cenotaph March Past at the Parade in Whitehall. The red poppy has become the symbol for Remembrance Sunday with poppy wreaths being laid at cenotaphs all over the country to commemorate Britain’s war dead. In more recent years there has been an increased appearance of the white poppy, a pacifist symbol of remembrance. White poppies, according to the Peace Pledge Union (PPU) represent remembrance for all victims of war, commitment to peace and a challenge to the glamorisation of conflict. The white poppy was produced in 1933 by the Women’s Co-operative Guild to symbolise ‘no more war’ and represents all victims of all wars. The red poppy appeal is organised by the Royal British Legion (RBL) and specifically represents remembrance associated with the British Armed Forces. There has been a long standing opposition to the white poppy, with critics suggesting that it undermines the message of remembrance around Armistice Day. However, St John’s Ambulance has changed its dress code policy to allow volunteers to wear the white poppy as an alternative. During the war when the soil was churned up by endless fighting, poppies still managed to flourish leading the red poppy to become a symbol of remembrance of the First World War. The poppy is also seen as a symbol to honour the millions of current servicemen and women who fight in our Armed Forces. Charities such as Blesma The Limbless Veterans also provide support to amputees from the Armed Forces. They currently help 1873 amputees who lost limbs in the line of duty. Every year a member of Wyedean attends the local service in Haworth to lay a wreath to honour those who have fallen. Which service will you be attending this year? Will you hold a two minutes silence at 11am? Listen out on Sunday for the half muffled church bells. To make a donation to the Poppy Appeal visit the British Legion website here: http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/

2021-03-30T15:06:25+01:0030 October 2018|

Why do Military Regiments have Bands?

Music is an important and influential part of military life and is seen as a strong source of morale. Musicians support the regiments at ceremonial events and consist mostly of wind and percussion instruments. As well as appearing at parades such as the Remembrance Day Parade, military bands have also been known to be deployed on operations to Iraq to serve as army reserve soldiers. There are two types of historical traditions in military bands. The first uses field music instruments such as drums or trumpets. This type of band was used to control troops on the battlefields. Long before the high-tech battlefields of today, signalling in camp and on the field was carried out by the beating of a drum and the sounding of the trumpets. The second tradition uses brass and woodwind instruments. Bands were formed by soldiers, and each regiment in the British Army maintained its own military band. Until 1749 bandsmen were civilians and then at a later date became enlisted men who accompanied the regiment to provide music to raise the morale. The oldest British military band is the Royal Artillery Band which dates back to 1557. After 1994 the number of bands was reduced from 69 to 22. The Regular Army Bands in the British Army are part of the Corps of Army Music. They range from traditional marching bands to concert bands to small string orchestras. The Corps of Army Music (CAMUS) is dedicated to the provision of military music. Bands such as the Band of The Household Cavalry, The Royal Artillery Band, Band of the Scots Guards and the Band of the Queens Division make up the bands of the corps. Military bands vary in function, from troop entertainment to public relations to playing at special events.  They play ceremonial and marching music and the modern day military musicians perform in other styles such as rock and roll. View our Corps Of Army Music Items here

2021-03-30T16:39:55+01:0015 November 2016|
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