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The Rifles

The Rifles is the largest British Army infantry regiment. There are a wide range of jobs in the regiment, which, unlike any other regiment in the infantry, are a three hour travelling time from anywhere in the UK. The regiment was formed in 2007 as a result of the Future Army Structure and is made up of five Regular and two Reserve battalions. Since the formation of the regiment, it has been involved in many combat operations such as the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan. The Band and Bugles of The Rifles was formed by renaming the Band and Bugles of the Light Division. This then formed the band for The Rifles. The Buglers are selected from the regular battalions and are trained to play the bugle and a fast march of 140 paces per minute. A private soldier in a rifle regiment is known as a Rifleman and Sergeant, which is spelt in the archaic fashion. The founding regiments have each contributed to the ceremonial uniform today. The black buttons are worn on all forms of the rifles dress, except the combat and the bugle horn badge of the Light Infantry is worn on the cap badge. The Maltese Cross of the Royal Green Jackets is worn as a buckle on the cross belt and the French Croix de Guerre ribbon is worn on both sleeves of the No. 1 and No. 2 dress. The Rifles hold 913 battle honours, including 117 Victoria Crosses. The regimental motto is ‘swift and bold’ and the ‘Rifles’ name is broken down to stand for: Respect, Independence, Friends for Life, Learning, Excitement and Success. To view our range of uniform accessories for The Rifles click here.

2021-03-30T15:15:57+01:0013 September 2018|

When is a Waist Sash Worn?

Prince Louis Wearing Waist Shoulder Sash A sash is usually a large and colourful ribbon or band of material that is worn around the body. Sashes either drape from one shoulder to the opposing hip, or run around the waist. The shoulder sash is worn in daily attire by the Duty Sergeant while the Waist Sash is worn on ceremonial occasions. Historically, a waist sash was made using a technique called spranging. The process of spragning produces a wide fabric, that like a netting, can widen and contract. Many metres of woollen cord are placed on a special spranging machine and often these machines were two storeys high running through a hole in the floor to the lower level. The machines are worked by hand to create the sprung fabric. It is believed that only two machines are left in the UK, one of which is in a museum in London and the second here at Wyedean. The idea behind using this type of net construction was that if an officer was wounded on the battlefield, his sash could be used as a stretcher. This dual-purpose benefit became less relevant, however, when the sash was modified from being a shoulder sash to one worn around the waist in 1768. The length was gradually reduced for more convenient wearing. Prince Will Wearing Waist Sash Since a sergeant’s sash was to be worn around the waist, its length was greatly reduced from the outset. It is obvious from the various lengths of surviving sashes that they were intended to go around the waist once. However, they were also spranged like the officer’s sashes. There were a number of variations: some had fixed knots while others were finished with fringes, frayed or knotted off. The modern British Army retains a scarlet sash for wear in certain orders of dress by those of sergeant rank and above serving in infantry regiments, over the right shoulder to the left hip. A similar crimson silk net sash is worn around the waist by officers of the Foot Guards in scarlet full dress and officers of line infantry in dark blue "Number 1" dress. The sash is also worn by Regiments and Corps performing ceremonial duties.

2021-03-30T16:52:53+01:0010 August 2016|
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