Haberdashery

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Wyedean’s bespoke commissions

Wyedean is known mostly for manufacturing accessories and accoutrements for the Armed Forces around the world.  We are, occasionally asked to produce some specialist items too. The business once received an order from The Royal Jordanian Army which had a camel mounted ceremonial regiment. The order was for fringing to hang over the camels eyes, similar to false eyelashes. The purpose was to stop flies or sand irritating the camel’s eyes. Over the years the fringe has become more ornate for ceremonial purposes. We supply a wide range of headwear for use in many different applications; from the standard ceremonial peaked caps to cadet helmets and covers which we were commissioned to design, develop and test. We have also more recently manufactured the bespoke costume tea cup headwear for the famous Yorkshire Tea marching band. One of our newer products is the Kevlar webbing. This is a key component in protective, flame resistant clothing. The webbing is used by blue light services and is useful where protection is needed against physical, electrical, heat or chemical particulates. More recently our Kevlar webbing has been used  in circus’s around the world on juggling sticks which are set alight. As Wyedean is known for the manufacture of braids and tapes, we were asked to produce thousands of meters of binding tape/ bandages for the film The Mummy. The bandages were soaked in tea to achieve the desired effect. As well as tape used in films, Wyedean has also made a jute webbing used to lower coffins into graves and also a saltpeter-dipped touch cord for firing antique cannon used in salutes.  Wyedean’s skills are not just limited to military uniforms. A recent commission saw the company manufacture bespoke flying suits for a helicopter transport company.  The business was also commissioned by one of Michael Jackson’s costumiers to manufacture a military type of cord/ frogging to be stitched on to one of his jackets. The costumier told us that the costume would also have cooling installed by way of thin tubes of chilled liquid circulating within to help keep him cool during his performance.  Wyedean regularly take on bespoke commissions. Contact our sales team today to discuss your requirements.

2021-03-30T14:54:26+01:0020 June 2019|

The Royal Lancers

Queen Elizabeths’ own Royal Lancers are the armored cavalry regiment of 12 Armored Infantry Brigade. Their motto is ‘Death or Glory’ and their famous skull and crossbones cap badge is one of the most recognizable. The regiment is located in North Yorkshire at Catterick Garrison. They have been active from the 2nd of May 2015 and they specialize in reconnaissance. The soldiers in the Royal Lancers are also trained to fight enemy combatants using a wide range of equipment. The equipment they use mainly include Sharpshooter rifles, machine guns, mortars and anti-task missiles. The Royal Lancers main role is to provide a continuous stream of accurate information to commanders so they can make tactical decisions.  Although they have been active since 2015, their history stretches back more than 300 years. In 1715, the 9th and 12th Regiments of Dragoons were raised and the union of several historical lancer regiments. In 1993 The Queen’s Royal Lancers was formed and in 2015 the 9th/12th Royal Lancers and the Queen’s Royal Lancers joined to form The Royal Lancers. In 2017 the Queen granted the Regiment its title of ‘Queen Elizabeths’ Own’ meaning that their Colonel-in-Chief is HM The Queen. To view our range of The Royal Lancers products click here.

2021-03-30T14:55:05+01:008 April 2019|

Textile Waste Recycled and given to Local Schools.

Wyedean currently bags up its waste yarn, material off-cuts and cones, and rather than processing it through traditional waste disposal methods recently delivered these to local schools for children to re-use.  Recent recipients of these materials were schools in Oldfield, Stanbury, Ingrow, Haworth, Oxenhope and Oakworth. The cones are used by school children for modelling while the materials and yarns are used for gluing and craft projects. We also donated 80 kilos to a school near Boroughbridge. Altogether Wyedean has donated and delivered over 250 cones and 200 kilos of textile waste.  Wyedean is now working towards a new target of distributing 100 kilos of waste amongst local schools per year.  Not only is this is a fun resource for local schools, but it’s also good for the environment as this waste would ordinarily be disposed of in landfill.

2021-03-30T15:01:37+01:005 February 2019|

Wyedean at the Movies

While Wyedean primarily manufactures regalia and accoutrement for the military, armed and uniformed services, it also supplies to the film and television industry through production companies and costumiers. In fact, the company has supplied goods for numerous high profile blockbuster movies and TV productions in recent years. Some of the more famous movies Wyedean has supplied goods for include Fury starring Brad Pitt, Gulliver’s Travels starring Jack Black, The Mummy, Harry Potter and Saving Private Ryan. John Cleese played Nearly Headless Nick in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Wyedean supplied the tunic buttons worn by Nick. Wyedean also supplied the production company behind Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan with webbings for use on the soldier’s uniforms. For The Mummy, Wyedean was tasked with producing thousands of metres of binding tape/bandages that were wrapped around the film’s mummies. Wyedean supplied a wide range of army uniform regalia for Gulliver’s Travels which starred Billy Connolly and Jack Black. View a BBC news clip.The helmet chin straps worn by the soldiers in Brad Pitt’s Fury were manufactured by Wyedean. Other films Wyedean items can be found in include Master and Commander, Saving Private Ryan, The Man in the Iron Mask, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Band of Brothers, The Four Feathers, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. If you represent a film or television production company, or work in the costume or wardrobe department then we’d love to hear from you. Wyedean regularly takes on bespoke commissions and is happy to discuss your requirements.

2021-03-30T15:01:46+01:0029 January 2019|

Remembrance Day 2018

On Sunday the 11th of November 2018 at 11am the country will fall silent to remember those who fought for our country. This year Armistice Day and Remembrance Day fall on the same day, sometimes this day is also known more informally as Poppy Day. Each year veterans participate in the Cenotaph March Past at the Parade in Whitehall. The red poppy has become the symbol for Remembrance Sunday with poppy wreaths being laid at cenotaphs all over the country to commemorate Britain’s war dead. In more recent years there has been an increased appearance of the white poppy, a pacifist symbol of remembrance. White poppies, according to the Peace Pledge Union (PPU) represent remembrance for all victims of war, commitment to peace and a challenge to the glamorisation of conflict. The white poppy was produced in 1933 by the Women’s Co-operative Guild to symbolise ‘no more war’ and represents all victims of all wars. The red poppy appeal is organised by the Royal British Legion (RBL) and specifically represents remembrance associated with the British Armed Forces. There has been a long standing opposition to the white poppy, with critics suggesting that it undermines the message of remembrance around Armistice Day. However, St John’s Ambulance has changed its dress code policy to allow volunteers to wear the white poppy as an alternative. During the war when the soil was churned up by endless fighting, poppies still managed to flourish leading the red poppy to become a symbol of remembrance of the First World War. The poppy is also seen as a symbol to honour the millions of current servicemen and women who fight in our Armed Forces. Charities such as Blesma The Limbless Veterans also provide support to amputees from the Armed Forces. They currently help 1873 amputees who lost limbs in the line of duty. Every year a member of Wyedean attends the local service in Haworth to lay a wreath to honour those who have fallen. Which service will you be attending this year? Will you hold a two minutes silence at 11am? Listen out on Sunday for the half muffled church bells. To make a donation to the Poppy Appeal visit the British Legion website here: http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/

2021-03-30T15:06:25+01:0030 October 2018|

How to wear your Medals

The British Armed Forces recognise outstanding personal achievements by giving individuals from the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force and British Army various awards and decorations. Medals, ribbons and emblems awarded by HM The Queen are only permitted to be worn by the recipient. Whether friend or family, wearing someone else’s awards is classed as fraud. Ribbons can be worn without the medals themselves, apart from The Orders of the Garter and Thistle. Ribbons are to be worn over the left breast pocket button in the centre of the pocket. The ribbons are worn in rows with the most senior medal worn nearest the jacket lapel or front buttons, and in the top row if multiple rows are worn. The number of ribbons worn in a row depends on the width of the breast pocket, however, if the uniform has no breast pocket then the number of ribbons worn must be no more than five. If there is an incomplete row of ribbons, and there are already two or more rows worn, then the top row must be left incomplete and must be worn centrally. Each row of ribbons should be approximately 3 mm apart. Ribbons worn are to be stitched to the garment instead of mounted. Orders, decorations and medals are to be worn using an unseen brooch and on the left breast. If wearing a Full Dress tunic then they are usually placed in the middle, between the first and second buttons from the collar. Medals should be worn to show the Sovereign’s head. Orders, Decorations and Medals are to be worn at the following occasions: - State Occasions - Royal Occasions - Guards in London - Military Funerals - Guards on Royal residences - Guards of honour - Guards in Edinburgh - Ceremonial and Sovereign’s parades - Parades incorporating a religious service Orders, Decorations and Medals are worn on Full Dress, Frockcoat and No 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10 and 11 Dress. They are not to be worn on greatcoats and No 8 Combat Dress. Orders, Decorations and Medals are also not to be worn on operational or protective clothing. To view our range of medals and medal ribbons click here.

2021-03-30T15:17:06+01:0021 August 2018|

Dalton, Barton & Co Ltd.

Dalton Barton & Co was a textile manufacturing company founded near Coventry on the 16th of January 1852. The name Dalton and Barton corresponded with that of its two founding weavers: Robert Arnold Dalton and George Samuel Barton. Robert Dalton was born in 1825, the son of a plumber and glazier, but at the age of 14 he started a 7-year apprenticeship with William and John Sargent, who were ribbon makers in Coventry. In 1847 he became a ribbon manufacturer. Later in life he was elected an alderman and mayor of the city. Little is known of George Barton, only that he was a year younger than Robert Dalton. It wasn’t until 29th May 1872 that the company became a limited company. Dalton Barton & Co Ltd had an incorporated number of 6313, meaning that there were only 6312 incorporated companies before it so it was one of the first few. The company flourished and extended its range from ribbon making to narrow fabrics, braids, upholstery trimmings, uniform regalia and lanyards. The Company had a huge boost when it received the contract to produce Australian moquette tape used in railway carriages. Both the Coventry factory and its London marketing company continued to prosper and they became one of the largest haberdashery wholesalers in the world. In 1940 during WWII disaster struck when an air raid destroyed the whole Coventry factory. By this time the factory had focused all of its efforts on military narrow fabrics such a chevron lace, medal ribbon and parachute harnesses etc. This meant it was able to obtain Government funding to build a new factory on Mason Road, Coventry. As the war progressed, sourcing the pure silk for the weaving of medal ribbons became increasingly difficult. Nylon was suggested as an alternative - at the time it was a newly-developed material. King George VI refused stating that his award medals were for superior acts of gallantry which would be manufactured from only the finest materials. David Wright, father of Robin Wright, the present owner, joined the company in 1959. He had no experience of narrow fabrics but was skilled in textile manufacturing management and design. He joined the company and moved the factory near the river Wye in Gloucester, which is close to the Forest of Dean. David then renamed the company Wyedean Weaving. In 1964 a severance was proposed by Dalton Barton and its subsidiary Wyedean Weaving. David Wright struck a deal to transfer all of the haberdashery production looms, in exchange for him being allowed to purchase the military production machinery. Wyedean Weaving was relocated to Haworth, West Yorkshire where David grew up and focused its energies on uniform accoutrement such as sergeant sashes, chevrons, RAF rank braid and naval collar tape which was mainly sold to customers such as the Ministry of Defence. To view our range of narrow fabrics click here.

2021-03-30T15:47:41+01:0025 January 2018|

Sprang Weaving

Sprang is an ancient method of constructing fabric that gives it an appearance similar to netting so that it has natural elasticity. Sprang, unlike netting, however, is constructed from entirely warp threads. The sprang structure is close to a Leno weave but without the weft so that it is inherently flexible. Although examples of sprang can be seen back in the Bronze Age, there were no written records until the late nineteenth century. These days knitting has taken over sprang constructions, however, there are many examples in museums of product woven in a sprang construction which is often misidentified as knitted. Wyedean possesses a sprang fabric hand loom, which, to the best of our knowledge is one of only two in existence, the other we understand is in London owned by the Royal School of Needlework. Our loom hasn’t been used for many years and was last used in the 1980s to manufacture British Army Generals Guards Full Dress and Undress waist sash ribbons, also for Scottish Regiment Officers’ shoulder sash, all woven in pure silk and 2% gold threads. Unfortunately, these products were converted over to power loom production using synthetic threads in the late 1980s as a cost saving measure. To view our range of sashes click here.

2021-03-30T15:53:41+01:0017 October 2017|

Dalton Barton World War II Letter

The Wyedean Weaving Company established itself in Haworth in 1964 as a manufacturer of narrow fabrics, braid and uniform accoutrement. The business originated in Coventry around 1850 and was previously known as Dalton, Barton and Co Ltd. During WWII, the main factory in Coventry was completely destroyed during the Blitz in 1941. The company’s East End London warehouse and store in Jewin Street London were also later destroyed. For this reason the company possesses no artefacts or records dating from before the Blitz, nor evidence of this difficult time in the Company’s history…that is until recently when the letter shown below came to light from one of Dalton Barton’s war-time customers. Gary Smith is the current owner of fourth-generation upholsterers JE Smith and Son, and he tracked Wyedean down when he found the letter from Dalton, Barton hidden away in the company’s workshop. Gary’s grandfather purchased webbing from Dalton, Barton during the war and his company manufactured sewing bags for gas masks. JE Smith and Son is approaching its 100th year in business and these days focuses on high quality upholstery work. The company recently helped manufacture a bespoke chair called the Windsor Castle chair designed by Shaun Brownell from RhubarbLondon. The chair imitates the scarlet woollen ceremonial uniform of the Irish Guards and is replete with detailed buttons, buckles and accoutrement, which coincidently Wyedean manufactures and supplies to all the Guard’s regiments. To view Wyedean’s range of ceremonial regalia and accoutrement items click here.

2021-03-30T16:00:01+01:0017 August 2017|

The Invictus Games

The Invictus games are an international multi-sport event for Paralympic athletes. The first Invictus Games took place in 2014 in London. The event was created by Prince Harry so that wounded or injured armed service personnel or veterans can take part in sports. Sports at the event include sitting volleyball, wheelchair basketball and indoor rowing. The event was inspired by the Warrior Games in the US and was given its name ‘Invictus’ from the Latin word meaning undefeated. The second games opened on 8th May 2016 in Orlando while year’s games are set to be held in Toronto in September. Unlike previous years which were held at a single site, this year’s venue is set to be at multiple locations around the city. The Air Canada Centre will hold the opening and closing ceremonies. Other locations include Nathan Phillips Square, Ryerson’s Mattamy Athletic Centre and York Lions Stadium. There are 17 countries invited to take part in the Games. Afghanistan Australia Canada Denmark Estonia France Georgia Germany Iraq Italy Jordan Netherlands New Zealand Romania Ukraine UK US Wyedean manufactures the medal ribbon for the Invictus Games. The sunshine yellow medal ribbon is produced in bulk in our textile mill. The ribbon is 25mm wide and is a nylon/cotton composition. A total of 900 metres of the medal ribbon is being produced. We stock a variety of medal ribbons on our webstore. To view our range click here. Wyedean are specialists in manufacturing narrow fabrics. To view our full range click here.

2021-03-30T16:05:52+01:0010 July 2017|
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