Tag - Wyedean

Dalton Barton

Dalton, Barton & Co Ltd.

Dalton Barton & Co was a textile manufacturing company founded near Coventry on the 16th of January 1852. The name Dalton and Barton corresponded with that of its two founding weavers: Robert Arnold Dalton and George Samuel Barton. Robert Dalton was born in 1825, the son of a plumber and glazier, but at the age of 14 he started a 7-year apprenticeship with William and John Sargent, who were ribbon makers in Coventry. In 1847 he became a ribbon manufacturer. Later in life he was elected an alderman and mayor of the city. Little is known of George Barton, only that he was a year younger than Robert Dalton. It wasn’t until 29th May 1872 that the company became a limited company. Dalton Barton & Co Ltd had an incorporated number of 6313, meaning that there were only 6312 incorporated companies before it so it was one of the first few. The company flourished and extended its range from ribbon making to [...]

Snowy Mill

Merry Christmas from the Wyedean team

    Merry Christmas from all of the team at Wyedean This year, instead of sending Christmas cards the company made a donation to our nominated charity: Airedale Hospital Neo-Natal Clinic. To read more about the unit click here. We close for Christmas on Friday 22nd December and will reopen on Tuesday the 2nd January.

Yarn

Sprang Weaving

Sprang is an ancient method of constructing fabric that gives it an appearance similar to netting so that it has natural elasticity. Sprang, unlike netting, however, is constructed from entirely warp threads. The sprang structure is close to a Leno weave but without the weft so that it is inherently flexible. Although examples of sprang can be seen back in the Bronze Age, there were no written records until the late nineteenth century. These days knitting has taken over sprang constructions, however, there are many examples in museums of product woven in a sprang construction which is often misidentified as knitted. Wyedean possesses a sprang fabric hand loom,similar to the one in the picture, which, to the best of our knowledge is one of only two in existence, the other we understand is in London owned by the Royal School of Needlework. Our loom hasn’t been used for many years and was last used in the 1980s to manufacture British Army Generals Guards Full [...]

Dalton Barton

Dalton Barton World War II Letter

The Wyedean Weaving Company established itself in Haworth in 1964 as a manufacturer of narrow fabrics, braid and uniform accoutrement. The business originated in Coventry around 1850 and was previously known as Dalton, Barton and Co Ltd. During WWII, the main factory in Coventry was completely destroyed during the Blitz in 1941. The company’s East End London warehouse and store in Jewin Street London were also later destroyed. For this reason the company possesses no artefacts or records dating from before the Blitz, nor evidence of this difficult time in the Company’s history…that is until recently when the letter shown below came to light from one of Dalton Barton’s war-time customers. Gary Smith is the current owner of fourth-generation upholsterers JE Smith and Son, and he tracked Wyedean down when he found the letter from Dalton, Barton hidden away in the company’s workshop. Gary’s grandfather purchased webbing from Dalton, Barton during the war and his company manufactured sewing bags for gas [...]

David in the Mill

David Wright Founder of Wyedean

Wyedean was formally founded on 7th April, 1964, by David Wright. Before starting his own business, David’s first job after leaving school was as an apprentice textile designer at Bridgehouse mill. Little did he know that 34 years later he would purchase the very same building. At the age of 18 and at the outbreak of the Second World War, David volunteered for the Royal Navy, specifically The Fleet Air Arm. After pilot training in Canada he qualified as a commissioned Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve fighter pilot and served with the now- Legendary Catapult Aircraft Merchant ships NAS (Naval Air Station). 804 Sailing from Belfast in 1941. This squadron provided Air reconnaissance from mid Atlantic to the Western approaches, in trying to protect the British desperately needed convoys from submarine attacks, which were being alerted by the long range German Focke Wulf Condors and causing terrible shipping losses. The Hurricane fighters would have been rocketed fromthe converted Merchant ships to [...]

1940s weekend 2017

Haworth 1940s Weekend 2017

The annual Haworth 1940s weekend this year took place between Friday the 19th of May and Sunday the 21st of May. This famous annual event sees Haworth transformed into a traditional World War II version of itself with locals and visitors dressing in 1940s attire to celebrate and commemorate the war, but to also help raise money for Armed Forces and local charities. This year’s chosen charity was the Pilgrim Bandits Charity, which was formed by veterans of the Special Forces in order to inspire wounded soldiers to live life to its fullest, in spite of often dreadful injuries. To date, the 1940s weekend has raised almost £100,000 for charities. 2016’s focus was on the strategic importance of the airborne forces, while 2017’s theme was on the contribution made by Special Forces. The 1940s weekend attracts over 25,000 visitors a day but this year, however, due to the wet weather, the footfall on Saturday was significantly reduced. 2017 is the final year that [...]

Scots Grey Eagle

Flag of the 45th Line

Ensign Charles Ewart was a Scottish soldier of the Royal North British Dragoons and is most famous for capturing the regimental eagle of the 45th Regiment of the Line flag at the Battle of Waterloo. The French Imperial Eagle was gilded bronze and fixed to the top of a staff carrying the standard of the French 45th Infantry Regiment. The imperial eagle is one of the most iconic objects from the Napoleonic period and was a symbol of pride and loyalty among French troops who would form the backbone of Napoleon’s newly-formed regime. On June 10th 1815, the 45eme de la Ligne received its new eagle which was carried into the Battle of Waterloo by Pierre Guillot, where it would, after a bloody and brutal battle, be famously captured by Ewart. This symbolic victory made Ewart a hero and this captured eagle is now kept in Edinburgh Castle as one of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards most prized honours. So famous was this [...]

Royal Irish Regiement

Blue is the Colour

The soldiers chosen to Troop the Colour, on June 17th at Horse Guards Parade, have this year been examined to check they are up to the job. The 1st Battalion The Irish Guards were inspected in their red tunics by General Officer Commanding London District and Major General Commanding the Household Division, Ben Bathurst. The Irish Guards wear a blue plume on the right side of their bearskins, and given that this is The Queen’s Blue Sapphire Jubilee, this seems very appropriate. The mantle and sash of the Order of St. Patrick, is also blue. Everything from the tailoring of the uniform to the regiment’s ability to march to time was under scrutiny by The Major General at Cavalry Barracks in Hounslow. Dohmall, the regiment’s famous wolfhound mascot was also on parade. Prince William, The Duke of Cambridge, became Colonel of The Irish Guards in 2011 and this year will be the first time since 2009 that their soldiers have trooped the [...]

Wyedean Exhibiting at IDEX 2017

International Defence Exhibition and conference (IDEX)

Wyedean IDEX Exhibition The International Defence Exhibition and Conference, or IDEX as it’s more commonly known, is the most important tri-service defence exhibition in the world. It is the only international defence exhibition of its kind; demonstrating the latest technology for defence for land, sea and air. The conference is held every two years at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre and fills the full 133,000sqm of its event space. This year the IDEX conference takes place during the 19th-23rd of February. IDEX is held under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the UAE and Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces and is organised by the IDEX LLC in association and with the full support of the UAE Armed Forces. More than 100,000 people attend the conference from across the world. The people attending also include representatives from Defence Ministers, and Army, Navy and Airforce Commanders. There are 12 indoor exhibition halls full of local [...]

Ceremonial Guard Military Plume

What is a Hackle/ Plume?

The plume/hackle is generally made from clipped chicken feathers and is worn on a military headdress purely for decorative or ornamental purposes. The colour of the plume differs between regiments but they are mostly worn by infantry regiments, especially those designated as fusilier regiments. The large plume was originally named a heckle by the Scots, and was attached to the feather bonnet worn by the Highland regiments, drummers, pipers and bandsmen. The smaller version was adopted by the 42nd Royal Highland Regiment and to be worn as a sun helmet. The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers wears a very distinctive red and white hackle. The regiment was awarded the hackle to recognise its defeat of the French at the Battle of St Lucia in 1778. The white hackles were removed from dead French soldiers and then in 1829 the regiment was ordered by King William IV to make their white plumes more distinguished with a red tip. Shop Now