Tag - Uniform

Lord Lieutenant

Lord Lieutenant

A Lord-Lieutenant is a personal representative for the British monarch in each county of the United Kingdom. Today Lord Lieutenancy is mostly a ceremonial position, but historically they were responsible for organising the county’s militia. The Lord Lieutenant is the highest rank of the lieutenants, followed by a Vice Lord Lieutenant and then Deputy Lieutenants. The Vice Lord Lieutenant takes over duties if the Lord Lieutenant is ill or unable to attend. There are usually between 30 to 40 Deputy Lieutenants appointed by the Lord Lieutenant depending on the county’s size. The main duties performed by a Lord Lieutenant are arranging visits for members of the royal family, as well as escorting royal visitors, presenting medals on behalf of the sovereign and participating in civic and social activities within the lieutenancy. The uniform worn by Lord Lieutenants is military in style and has many similarities with army uniforms. Currently Lord Lieutenants wear a dark blue uniform in the style of a General [...]

Ceremonial Guard Military Plume

What is a Hackle/ Plume?

The plume/hackle is generally made from clipped chicken feathers and is worn on a military headdress purely for decorative or ornamental purposes. The colour of the plume differs between regiments but they are mostly worn by infantry regiments, especially those designated as fusilier regiments. The large plume was originally named a heckle by the Scots, and was attached to the feather bonnet worn by the Highland regiments, drummers, pipers and bandsmen. The smaller version was adopted by the 42nd Royal Highland Regiment and to be worn as a sun helmet. The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers wears a very distinctive red and white hackle. The regiment was awarded the hackle to recognise its defeat of the French at the Battle of St Lucia in 1778. The white hackles were removed from dead French soldiers and then in 1829 the regiment was ordered by King William IV to make their white plumes more distinguished with a red tip. Shop Now

United Kingdom Special Air Service (SAS)

The Special Air Service (SAS) is the British Army’s most renowned United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) unit. Its motto is ‘Who Dares Wins’ and has become well known all over the world. The SAS was created by David Stirling in 1941 as a desert raiding regiment mainly for carrying out sabotage missions. During 1950 the unit was changed from a regiment to a corps. The SAS’ roles include counter terrorism, hostage rescue and covert reconnaissance. Currently the corps is made up of the 22 Special Air Service Regiment, the 21 Special Air Service Regiment (Reserve) and the 23 Special Air Service Regiment (Reserve). In order to become part of the Regiment, soldiers have to pass a number of exercises and tests during a five-week-long selection process. Although there are around 200 applicants each time, only 30 usually make it through. The first SAS mission was in 1941 and involved a parachute drop in support of the Operation Crusader offensive. This mission, due [...]

Waist Belts - Trooping of the Colour

When is a Waist Sash Worn?

Prince Louis Wearing Waist Shoulder Sash A sash is usually a large and colourful ribbon or band of material that is worn around the body. Sashes either drape from one shoulder to the opposing hip, or run around the waist. The shoulder sash is worn in daily attire by the Duty Sergeant while the Waist Sash is worn on ceremonial occasions. Historically, a waist sash was made using a technique called spranging. The process of spragning produces a wide fabric, that like a netting, can widen and contract. Many metres of woollen cord are placed on a special spranging machine and often these machines were two storeys high running through a hole in the floor to the lower level. The machines are worked by hand to create the sprung fabric. It is believed that only two machines are left in the UK, one of which is in a museum in London and the second here at Wyedean. The idea behind using this [...]

RAF College Remembrance Parade 2009

What is the Purpose of a Sword Knot?

The sword knot began existence as a simple cord attached to the hilt of the sword of a mounted soldier. The knot is in fact, a loop usually made out of leather, or other material. Before engagement with the enemy the soldier wraps the loop around his wrist to prevent the loss of his sword, which can happen either in the heat of the battle or if he needs to relax his group in order to steady his mount. In more recent years the sword knot has gradually evolved to become a more ornamental and decorative piece of uniform regalia. The design of it has also changed such that it now features a double strap which is also attached to the sword guard and wrapped around the hilt when not attached to the wrist. There are two main types of sword knots: full dress and active service. The sword knot used for active service features a plain buff leather strap, while the [...]

Armed Forces Day 2016

Armed Forces Day 2016

This year, Armed Forces Day, formerly Veterans’ Day, will be celebrated across the UK on Saturday 25th of June. It is a chance for everyone to show their support for the men and women who have been, or still are, a part of the Armed Forces. Organisations across the country have already started to show their support by flying the flag in support of the British Armed Forces. The event first started in 2006 and in the years proceeding has grown into a national day of celebration. In 2009 its name was changed to Armed Forces Day and it’s now accepted as always falling on the last Saturday in June. The aim of the day is to ensure that members of the Armed Forces, past and present, are never forgotten and that their contributions are remembered. There are many activities happening up and down the country to celebrate the event and every year the event takes place in a different city. Previous locations include Birmingham, [...]

Webbing and Flat Braid in Manufactured In-House

Which Narrow Fabric will Suit my Needs?

Wyedean has manufactured narrow fabrics for over 150 years. Although its product range has grown vastly, narrow fabrics remain one of its core products.  Everything that Wyedean holds in stock is available to buy on the webshop which also showcases the live stock figure. For rolls of 50 metres of more, please contact us directly for a quote. If you have any other requirements Wyedean can manufacture in various colours and using a variety of compositions. Braids – A lightweight narrow fabric which is made up of three or more strands to form a plaited structure. Flat Braid A flat braided construction created with the diagonal interweaving of threads. Hercules Braid A flat braided construction created with longitudinal threads as well to eliminate constructional stretch. Llama Braid A flat braided construction using 73 ends of fine-count worsted yarn. Russia Braid A flat braided construction using twin rib tracing braid. String Braid Strings made with a braided and knit braided tubular construction. Tubular Braid A braid made with a hollow core to create a [...]

Iconic Police Helmet

West Yorkshire Police Say Goodbye To The Iconic Police Hat

With over 5,000 police officers, West Yorkshire has one of the largest police forces in England and it’s in this county that the traditional police helmet has stood the test of time for over 150 years. But the Metropolitan Police is a modern, progressive and forward-thinking organisation and after being perhaps the most recognisable and iconic part of a policeman’s uniform for so long, it’s out with the old and in with the new, as the traditional Victorian-style hard-hat has finally been retired to be replaced with a more practical, light-weight peak cap. More appropriate and functional for a modern police force, the new peak cap is particularly striking thanks to the black and white diced-check lace that wraps around the cap above the peak. A lace that is made in-house here at Wyedean and sold in a variety of colours and styles. Click here to view our selection of diced-check cap bands. The original helmet, however, remains a proud symbol [...]

Aiguillette

Where Did The Aiguillette Come From?

Aiguillette is an old French word for needle or tag, and refers to the metal tag at the end of the cords. Its origin is the same as shoe laces: both originate in the medieval period for tying clothes, shoes and armour. They are most commonly braided from gold or silver wire and feature pointed metal tips. Aiguillettes come in many different styles, ranging from the gold-wire cord aiguillettes worn by Equerries and Aides de Camp to the Monarch, to simpler corded aiguillettes worn by lower ranks and bandsmen in full dress. With the pristine detailing of the braids, aiguillettes are one of the more desirable features of a Full Officer Dress Uniform. In the 17th Century buff leather coats were worn as armour. With these being up to 5mm thick, buttons were impracticable, so leather or cord ‘points’ were used to fasten the coat. The sleeves of the coat were also made of buff leather and laced to the [...]

Soldiers being awarded the Military Medal

The Military Medal Ribbon

The Military Medal (MM), created by King George V in March 1916, was a way to acknowledge the acts of bravery in war which were not considered worthy enough to receive a Distinguished Conduct Medal.  Warrant officers, non-commissioned officers, and men on the recommendation of a Commander in Chief in the field were awarded this medal. During WWI, 108 members of the Royal Newfound Regiment received the Military Medal. A silver bar was also given out to eight of these recipients which signified subsequent acts of bravery. The Military Medal is shown below feturing a picture of the sovereign. In the First World War this medal depicted a bare-headed King George V in a Field Marshall’s uniform. The reverse of the medal reads “For Bravery in the Field”, circled by a laurel wreath with the Royal Cypher and Imperial Crown on top. The medal is displayed on a dark blue ribbon with red and white stripes. It is this medal ribbon [...]