Tag - Textile Mill

Yarn

Sprang Weaving

Sprang is an ancient method of constructing fabric that gives it an appearance similar to netting so that it has natural elasticity. Sprang, unlike netting, however, is constructed from entirely warp threads. The sprang structure is close to a Leno weave but without the weft so that it is inherently flexible. Although examples of sprang can be seen back in the Bronze Age, there were no written records until the late nineteenth century. These days knitting has taken over sprang constructions, however, there are many examples in museums of product woven in a sprang construction which is often misidentified as knitted. Wyedean possesses a sprang fabric hand loom,similar to the one in the picture, which, to the best of our knowledge is one of only two in existence, the other we understand is in London owned by the Royal School of Needlework. Our loom hasn’t been used for many years and was last used in the 1980s to manufacture British Army Generals Guards Full [...]

David in the Mill

David Wright Founder of Wyedean

Wyedean was formally founded on 7th April, 1964, by David Wright. Before starting his own business, David’s first job after leaving school was as an apprentice textile designer at Bridgehouse mill. Little did he know that 34 years later he would purchase the very same building. At the age of 18 and at the outbreak of the Second World War, David volunteered for the Royal Navy, specifically The Fleet Air Arm. After pilot training in Canada he qualified as a commissioned Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve fighter pilot and served with the now- Legendary Catapult Aircraft Merchant ships NAS (Naval Air Station). 804 Sailing from Belfast in 1941. This squadron provided Air reconnaissance from mid Atlantic to the Western approaches, in trying to protect the British desperately needed convoys from submarine attacks, which were being alerted by the long range German Focke Wulf Condors and causing terrible shipping losses. The Hurricane fighters would have been rocketed fromthe converted Merchant ships to [...]

Navy Medals

Medal Ribbon

Medals, Military Orders and Decorations are given to members of the armed forces to recognise and celebrate their personal accomplishments. Medal bars or clasps can be attached to the ribbon to indicate the operation for which the recipient received the award. Multiple bars on the same medal are used to recognise multiple achievements. All military services use a common order of wear which basically dictates the order in which the recognised military decorations must be worn, and is shown below: 1.    The Victoria Cross and the George Cross 2.    United Kingdom Orders 3.    United Kingdom Decorations 4.    Order of St John (all classes) 5.    United Kingdom Medals for Gallantry and for Distinguished Service 6.    United Kingdom Operational Service Medals (including authorised United Nations Medals and Medals of other recognised International Organisations). Worn in order of date of award 7.    United Kingdom Polar Medals 8.    United Kingdom Police Medals for Valuable Service 9.    United Kingdom Jubilee, Coronation and Durbar Medals 10.    Long Service and Efficiency Awards 11.    Commonwealth Orders, Decorations and Medals [...]

Our Story

Wyedean Weaving: Our Story

Wyedean Weaving was formally founded on 7 April, 1964, by David Wright. Before starting his own business, David’s first job after leaving school was an apprentice textile designer at Bridgehouse mill. Little did he know that 34 years later he would go onto purchase the very same building. At the age of 18, and at the outbreak of the Second World War, David volunteered for the Royal Navy, specifically The Fleet Air Arm. After pilot training in Canada he became a commissioned Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve fighter pilot and served with the now legendary Catapult Aircraft Merchant ships. Wyedean was established in 1964 as a manufacturer of braid and uniform accoutrement. Previously the business was known as Dalton Barton. David joined the company in 1959 and he was chosen to introduce new blood to the company, to take a hard look at the firm and to move the business away from Coventry as it was proving increasingly difficult to compete [...]

British Military Parade

Wyedean is to Appear in Every Parade

Wyedean’s mission is ‘To appear in every parade’ a tall order for most in its trade, but this gives Wyedean plenty to work towards, particularly given its new international goals and ambitions through website development and overseas developments. The media is often full of national and international ceremonies and parades and Wyedean takes it in its stride to find video footage from these events so that it can ensure that it is either in these events, or that it can supply our uniforms and accessories for the next parade or ceremony. All uniformed British serviceman will at least wear a badge or rank marking which has been produced by Wyedean. Every Policeman serving in the London Metropolitan Police Force will have their service numbers (letters and numerals) on their shoulder epaulettes which are also supplied by Wyedean. This makes Wyedean’s products as prominent in the British market as any other around the globe. However, Wyedean continually aspires to make itself more [...]

Princess Anne Visit

A Royal Visit: Princess Anne

2014 was a big year for Wyedean as it saw it celebrating 50 years of manufacturing in Haworth. To commemorate this special occasion, Wyedean received a royal visit from HRH Princess Anne on the 27th February 2015. This memorable event was greeted with open arms from the staff at Wyedean, who were most honoured to meet The Princess Royal. Princess Anne and many local dignitaries were given a guided tour of Wyedean, many of whom showed particular interest in the traditional textile mill from which Wyedean has operated for many years. The Princess Royal spoke knowledgably to Wyedean’s Managing Director, Robin Wright and impressed with her enthusiasm and vast knowledge of Wyedean’s products, many of which she has actually worn. Princess Anne expressed a particular interest in the saddlery items and hand embroidery. If you are interested to see more information from the royal visit. Check out the newspaper article in the Telegraph and Argus here.

Wyedean Weaving Building

Development Manufacture Supply

Development – Manufacture – Supply. Three words that are central to Wyedean’s core business practices. Wyedean is not just a supplier of goods constantly churning out product after product. It’s skilled and experienced team see products right through from the drafting and prototyping stage, to their manufacture, testing and final delivery to the customer. Wyedean constantly strives to maintain and improve its standards. Wyedean is ISO 9001:2008 and ISO 14001 accredited and also has Investors in People certification. Wyedean has a worldwide network of skilled, versatile suppliers who are trained to the top of their profession ready to supply the best quality product. Its contract management experts are ready to take on any challenge and its excellent administration and customer service teams are available for support. For contract or development enquiries, we suggest you visit Wyedean’s corporate website at www.wyedean.com. The launch of Wyedean Stores sees Wyedean maintaining its upward trend and allows it to sell commercially to the general public, in addition to [...]

David Flying

Why “Wyedean”?

Wyedean was previously known as Dalton Barton, the names of two Coventry ribbon weavers: Robert Dalton and George Barton, who formed a partnership in 1851. This partnership later diversified into the manufacture of coach lace and upholstery trimmings and the company then won orders to supply the newly-formed Australian railways with tape to join moquette seat covering, which proved to be a great boost to the firm. David Wright joined the company in 1959 and was given the responsibility of further developing the business and increasing its product scope. His first major decision was a location change, moving the company away from Coventry where there was extremely high competition for labour. Newly situated in Coleford, Somerset, it was here where Dalton Barton was also rebranded as Wyedean Weaving. But many people ask – why Wyedean? Well, the new location at Coleford was situated between the River Wye and the Forest of Dean, thus inspiring – Wyedean Weaving. Of course the “Weaving” part [...]