Tag - David Wright

David in the Mill

David Wright Founder of Wyedean

Wyedean was formally founded on 7th April, 1964, by David Wright. Before starting his own business, David’s first job after leaving school was as an apprentice textile designer at Bridgehouse mill. Little did he know that 34 years later he would purchase the very same building. At the age of 18 and at the outbreak of the Second World War, David volunteered for the Royal Navy, specifically The Fleet Air Arm. After pilot training in Canada he qualified as a commissioned Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve fighter pilot and served with the now- Legendary Catapult Aircraft Merchant ships NAS (Naval Air Station). 804 Sailing from Belfast in 1941. This squadron provided Air reconnaissance from mid Atlantic to the Western approaches, in trying to protect the British desperately needed convoys from submarine attacks, which were being alerted by the long range German Focke Wulf Condors and causing terrible shipping losses. The Hurricane fighters would have been rocketed fromthe converted Merchant ships to [...]

David Flying

Why “Wyedean”?

Wyedean was previously known as Dalton Barton, the names of two Coventry ribbon weavers: Robert Dalton and George Barton, who formed a partnership in 1851. This partnership later diversified into the manufacture of coach lace and upholstery trimmings and the company then won orders to supply the newly-formed Australian railways with tape to join moquette seat covering, which proved to be a great boost to the firm. David Wright joined the company in 1959 and was given the responsibility of further developing the business and increasing its product scope. His first major decision was a location change, moving the company away from Coventry where there was extremely high competition for labour. Newly situated in Coleford, Somerset, it was here where Dalton Barton was also rebranded as Wyedean Weaving. But many people ask – why Wyedean? Well, the new location at Coleford was situated between the River Wye and the Forest of Dean, thus inspiring – Wyedean Weaving. Of course the “Weaving” part [...]