Tag - British Army

Soldiers of the Royal Irish Regiment on Parade

The Royal Irish Regiment

The Royal Irish Regiment is made up of two Battalions, one Regular and one Reserve. The regiment is the only one to be awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross which was given by The Queen on the 6th of October 2006. The regiment was founded in 1992 through the amalgamation of the Royal Irish Rangers and the Ulster Defence Regiment. Its motto is ‘Faugh A Ballagh’ meaning Clear the Way. This originated from the Peninsular War when Ensign Edward Keogh of the 87th Regiment of Foot cried out when capturing a French Eagle. The 1st Battalion recently switched from air assault infantry to being at the forefront of developing the Foxhound vehicle. They are now the Army’s first Light Mechanized Battalion. The 2nd Battalion provides reinforcements to all 1st Battalion deployments and receives direct support from their Regular counterparts. The 2nd Battalion can also deploy personnel on operations overseas exercises in its own right. Both the 1st and 2nd Battalions could serve [...]

Military Chaplains

Military Chaplains

A chaplain is a religious representative who is attached to a secular institution such as a prison, military unit or hospital. Originally, the world chaplain referred to a representative of the Christian faith, but is now applied to all faiths and philosophical traditions. The first recorded English military chaplains were priests on board vessels during the 8th century, however, the current form of military chaplain dates back to the First World War. A military chaplain provides pastoral, emotional and spiritual support to service personnel. They often conduct religious services whilst at sea or on a military base and are nominated or commissioned in different ways in different countries. A military chaplain could be an army-trained soldier with theological training or an ordained person who is nominated to the army by religious authorities. The Ministry of Defence employs chaplains in the UK, but their authority comes from their church. The Royal Navy chaplains are sent on a 16 week bespoke training course. This [...]

Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment

Military White Parade Gloves

They are to be worn by RAF and PMRAFNS Officers with a No 1A and 6A service dress, whether or not a sword is being worn, and with No 1 and 6 service dress when a sword is worn. White gloves are to be worn by airmen and women with No 1 and service dress when participating in: State Occasions, Royal Occasions, Guards of Honour, Service Funerals, Sovereign’s Birthday Parades and Guards at Royal residences. White gloves and white webbing may be worn at other ceremonial events but this is usually authorised by personnel before the event. The gloves are made from 100% cotton and have stitching on the cuff with a button. We stock the white parade gloves on our website. Click here to view them.

Gurkha Rifles

Royal Gurkha Rifles

The Royal Gurkha Rifles (RGR) forms part of the Brigade of Gurkhas in the British Army. They are a rifle regiment whose soldiers are recruited from Nepal, but the British Officers are recruited from the UK and the Commonwealth. The two battalions of the RGR are formed as a light infantry role. All Officers in the regiment are expected to speak Nepali and will attend a language course if needed. The first battalion is based at Shorncliffe as part of the 16 Air Assault Brigade and are available for deployment to most areas in Europe and Africa. The second battalion is based in Brunei at the British garrison. This is part of Britain’s commitment to maintaining a military presence in Southeast Asia. The regiment’s motto is ‘Better to die than to be a coward’. The Gurkhas are considered to be some of the best infantrymen in the world, as is shown by their fighting skill and their smartness of turnout for parade. The [...]

Bradford Pals

The Bradford Pals

The Bradford Pals were the 16th and 18th Battalions of the West Yorkshire Regiment. The Pals regiments were units of men who lived, worked and socialised together. They then all signed up together. These units were raised early in the war as it was clear that Britain’s professional army was too small. The recruitment for the men started on 8th September and they were encouraged to join the army sacrificing their personal needs for the service of their country. The men were trained at the Manningham Lane Skating Rink and by the 26th of September a full Battalion of 1,069 was formed. These were to be the 16th (service) Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (1st Bradford). The 2nd Bradford or 18th (service) Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment was sanctioned on January 22nd 1915. By this time more advertising was needed as the initial patriotism had worn off. A new scheme was started in April 1915 with money rewards given to soldiers who brought [...]

Royal Artillery

The Royal Artillery (RA)

The Royal Artillery (RA) provides firepower to the British Army and is more commonly known as the ‘Gunners’. Regular and reserve units make up the Royal Artillery and are located all around the UK and Germany. Originally formed in 1716, the RA found its regimental home in Woolwich for almost 300 years until it was recently relocated to Larkhill in Salisbury Plains. The Regiment has sub-units, or batteries, which can be deployed independently and move around regiments. It is able to perform many different roles within a single regiment. The Royal Artillery answers directly to the reigning sovereign, currently Queen Elizabeth II through the Master Gunner who is Her Majesty’s chief advisor on artillery matters. The modern battlefield means that new equipment is constantly developed so soldiers and officers in the Royal Artillery have to be flexible enough to cope with the demands of this. Before World War II, Royal Artillery recruits were required to be at least 5 feet 4 inches tall. There [...]

Kings Troop

The King’s Troop 70th Anniversary Parade

The King’s Troop 70th Anniversary Parade is due to take place on the 19th of October 2017 in Hyde Park, London. The event celebrates 70 years since the troop’s formation with a royal Review by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery has existed since 1946 and had its first royal visit on 24th October 1947 by King George VI to the Riding Troop. He famously scratched out the name Riding and replaced it with King’s, and from then on in they were The King’s Troop. The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery form the Queen’s ceremonial Saluting Battery. The Troop is a mounted unit and is stationed at Woolwich, London. The troop’s duties include the firing of the Royal Salutes on royal anniversaries, and providing a gun carriage and team of block horses for state and military funerals. The troop also performs the duties of the Queen’s Life Guard at Horse Guard’s for one month each year. We [...]

Royal Regiment of Scotland

The Royal Regiment Of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of Scotland is the most senior and only Scottish line infantry regiment forming a core part of the British Army. The regiment consists of four regular battalions and two reserve battalions. As each battalion was formerly an individual regiment, they all maintain their former regimental pipes and drums to carry on the traditions of their antecedent regiments. The Royal Regiment of Scotland was formed in 2004 by the Secretary of State for Defence, Geoff Hoon, after a British Army restructuring. The regiment, along with the Rifles, is one of two line infantry regiments to maintain its own regular military band within the Corps of Army Music. This was formed through the amalgamation of the Highland Band and the Lowland Band of the Scottish Division. All battalions in the Royal Regiment of Scotland took the name of their former individual regiments. This was to preserve regional ties and former regimental identities. The order of battle is shown below: Regular battalions The [...]

Yarn

Sprang Weaving

Sprang is an ancient method of constructing fabric that gives it an appearance similar to netting so that it has natural elasticity. Sprang, unlike netting, however, is constructed from entirely warp threads. The sprang structure is close to a Leno weave but without the weft so that it is inherently flexible. Although examples of sprang can be seen back in the Bronze Age, there were no written records until the late nineteenth century. These days knitting has taken over sprang constructions, however, there are many examples in museums of product woven in a sprang construction which is often misidentified as knitted. Wyedean possesses a sprang fabric hand loom,similar to the one in the picture, which, to the best of our knowledge is one of only two in existence, the other we understand is in London owned by the Royal School of Needlework. Our loom hasn’t been used for many years and was last used in the 1980s to manufacture British Army Generals Guards Full [...]

Foot Guards

Foot Guards

The Foot Guards are the Regular Infantry regiments of the Household Division of the British Army. There are five active regiments of the Foot Guards and one reserve regiment: Grenadier Guards Coldstream Guards Scots Guards Irish Guards Welsh Guards Royal Guards Reserve Regiment A simple method to help distinguish between different Guards is by looking at the spacing of the buttons on their tunics. Grenadier Guards – evenly spaced tunic buttons. Coldstream Guards – paired tunic buttons. Scots Guards – tunic buttons in groups of three. Irish Guards – tunic buttons in groups of fours. Welsh Guards – tunic buttons in groups of fives. The ascending number of buttons also indicates the order in which the regiments were formed. Various other features on the uniform help distinguish between regiments such as the plumes, the collar badge and the shoulder badge. When the regiments all parade together they form up in the order of: Grenadier Guards on the right flank, then Scots Guards, Welsh Guards, Irish Guards and the Coldstream Guards on the left flank. [...]