Tag - British Army

Royal Navy Diver

Diver makes Great War Discovery and reunites family.

Roger Bennett, a police diver from the Yorkshire and Humber Regional Marine Unit, was searching for a murder weapon at the bottom of the River Loxley just to the North of Sheffield. During his dive he found what he first thought was an old coin, but when Mr Bennett resurfaced, realised he had actually found a medal. And with help from Clifton Park Museum in Rotherham determined that the medal belonged to Lance Corporal Stephen Smith the York and Lancaster Regiment. The young soldier fought in Gallipoli in Turkey on 2 July 1915 and died from wounds he received at Suvla bay on 9 August 2015. “I initially thought it was a coin, but as soon as I realised that it was medal I was amazed.  We quickly made the decision to attempt to reunite the medal with Stephen’s family. Our research started within hours of us finding it. We put a couple of photos on social media and the [...]

War Memorial Saved Rehoused

1914-1919 Roll of Honour War Memorial

War memorial almost lost forever as wartime researchers struggle to find it a new home.  The Roll of Honour was originally displayed at the Woodlands Lodge, Haworth, No185 (N) of the Grand United Order of Oddfellows Friendly Society for their fallen and served members in the Great War of 1914-1919. The memorial is a rectangular wooden board which has supporting pillars and a cornice. The Coat of Arms is at the top with the names of those who fell listed below it. The inscription reads “1914 Roll of Honour 1919/ Amicita Amor Et Veritas/ Members who have made the/ Supreme sacrifice.” Listed are the names of the 83 who served, 10 of whom sadly died and 73 who returned. The Regiments and Corps named on the Roll of Honour are listed below; – Army Ordinance Corps (AOC) – Army Service Corps (ASC) – Army Service Corps (motor transport) (ASC (mt)) – Coldstream Guards (CG) – Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding Regiment) (D of W (WR)) – Durham Light Infantry (DLI) – [...]

Queen's Diamond Jubilee Parade and Muster at Windsor Castle

The order of precedence for the British Army

The divisions of the regular army of the British Army have an order of precedence which dictates the order in which these divisions parade, from right to left. The unit on the extreme right, usually the Household Cavalry, is generally the highest ranking unit. Army Reserve units and Militia take precedence over regular units but this does not include the Honourable Artillery Company and The Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers. • Household Cavalry • Royal Horse Artillery • Royal Armoured Corps • Corps of Royal Engineers • Royal Regiment of Artillery • Royal Corps of Signals • Infantry • Foot Guards • Line Infantry • The Rifles • Special Air Service • Army Air Corps • Special Reconnaissance Regiment • Royal Army Chaplains Department • Royal Logistic Corps • Royal Army Medical Corps • Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers • Adjutant General’s Corps • Royal Army Veterinary Corps • Small Arms School Corps • Royal Army Dental Corps • Intelligence Corps • Royal Army Physical Training Corps • General Service Corps • Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps • Corps of Army Music • Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers [...]

The Rifles

The Rifles

The Rifles is the largest British Army infantry regiment. There are a wide range of jobs in the regiment, which, unlike any other regiment in the infantry, are a three hour travelling time from anywhere in the UK. The regiment was formed in 2007 as a result of the Future Army Structure and is made up of five Regular and two Reserve battalions. Since the formation of the regiment, it has been involved in many combat operations such as the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan. The Band and Bugles of The Rifles was formed by renaming the Band and Bugles of the Light Division. This then formed the band for The Rifles. The Buglers are selected from the regular battalions and are trained to play the bugle and a fast march of 140 paces per minute. A private soldier in a rifle regiment is known as a Rifleman and Sergeant, which is spelt in the archaic fashion. The founding regiments [...]

Medals in wear

How to wear your Medals

The British Armed Forces recognise outstanding personal achievements by giving individuals from the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force and British Army various awards and decorations. Medals, ribbons and emblems awarded by HM The Queen are only permitted to be worn by the recipient. Whether friend or family, wearing someone else’s awards is classed as fraud. Ribbons can be worn without the medals themselves, apart from The Orders of the Garter and Thistle. Ribbons are to be worn over the left breast pocket button in the centre of the pocket. The ribbons are worn in rows with the most senior medal worn nearest the jacket lapel or front buttons, and in the top row if multiple rows are worn. The number of ribbons worn in a row depends on the width of the breast pocket, however, if the uniform has no breast pocket then the number of ribbons worn must be no more than five. If there is an incomplete row of [...]

Soldiers of the Royal Irish Regiment on Parade

The Royal Irish Regiment

The Royal Irish Regiment is made up of two Battalions, one Regular and one Reserve. The regiment is the only one to be awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross which was given by The Queen on the 6th of October 2006. The regiment was founded in 1992 through the amalgamation of the Royal Irish Rangers and the Ulster Defence Regiment. Its motto is ‘Faugh A Ballagh’ meaning Clear the Way. This originated from the Peninsular War when Ensign Edward Keogh of the 87th Regiment of Foot cried out when capturing a French Eagle. The 1st Battalion recently switched from air assault infantry to being at the forefront of developing the Foxhound vehicle. They are now the Army’s first Light Mechanized Battalion. The 2nd Battalion provides reinforcements to all 1st Battalion deployments and receives direct support from their Regular counterparts. The 2nd Battalion can also deploy personnel on operations overseas exercises in its own right. Both the 1st and 2nd Battalions could serve [...]

Military Chaplains

Military Chaplains

A chaplain is a religious representative who is attached to a secular institution such as a prison, military unit or hospital. Originally, the world chaplain referred to a representative of the Christian faith, but is now applied to all faiths and philosophical traditions. The first recorded English military chaplains were priests on board vessels during the 8th century, however, the current form of military chaplain dates back to the First World War. A military chaplain provides pastoral, emotional and spiritual support to service personnel. They often conduct religious services whilst at sea or on a military base and are nominated or commissioned in different ways in different countries. A military chaplain could be an army-trained soldier with theological training or an ordained person who is nominated to the army by religious authorities. The Ministry of Defence employs chaplains in the UK, but their authority comes from their church. The Royal Navy chaplains are sent on a 16 week bespoke training course. This [...]

Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment

Military White Parade Gloves

They are to be worn by RAF and PMRAFNS Officers with a No 1A and 6A service dress, whether or not a sword is being worn, and with No 1 and 6 service dress when a sword is worn. White gloves are to be worn by airmen and women with No 1 and service dress when participating in: State Occasions, Royal Occasions, Guards of Honour, Service Funerals, Sovereign’s Birthday Parades and Guards at Royal residences. White gloves and white webbing may be worn at other ceremonial events but this is usually authorised by personnel before the event. The gloves are made from 100% cotton and have stitching on the cuff with a button. We stock the white parade gloves on our website. Click here to view them.

Gurkha Rifles

Royal Gurkha Rifles

The Royal Gurkha Rifles (RGR) forms part of the Brigade of Gurkhas in the British Army. They are a rifle regiment whose soldiers are recruited from Nepal, but the British Officers are recruited from the UK and the Commonwealth. The two battalions of the RGR are formed as a light infantry role. All Officers in the regiment are expected to speak Nepali and will attend a language course if needed. The first battalion is based at Shorncliffe as part of the 16 Air Assault Brigade and are available for deployment to most areas in Europe and Africa. The second battalion is based in Brunei at the British garrison. This is part of Britain’s commitment to maintaining a military presence in Southeast Asia. The regiment’s motto is ‘Better to die than to be a coward’. The Gurkhas are considered to be some of the best infantrymen in the world, as is shown by their fighting skill and their smartness of turnout for parade. The [...]

Bradford Pals

The Bradford Pals

The Bradford Pals were the 16th and 18th Battalions of the West Yorkshire Regiment. The Pals regiments were units of men who lived, worked and socialised together. They then all signed up together. These units were raised early in the war as it was clear that Britain’s professional army was too small. The recruitment for the men started on 8th September and they were encouraged to join the army sacrificing their personal needs for the service of their country. The men were trained at the Manningham Lane Skating Rink and by the 26th of September a full Battalion of 1,069 was formed. These were to be the 16th (service) Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (1st Bradford). The 2nd Bradford or 18th (service) Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment was sanctioned on January 22nd 1915. By this time more advertising was needed as the initial patriotism had worn off. A new scheme was started in April 1915 with money rewards given to soldiers who brought [...]