Author - Richard Horne

United Kingdom Special Air Service (SAS)

The Special Air Service (SAS) is the British Army’s most renowned United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF) unit. Its motto is ‘Who Dares Wins’ and has become well known all over the world. The SAS was created by David Stirling in 1941 as a desert raiding regiment mainly for carrying out sabotage missions. During 1950 the unit was changed from a regiment to a corps. The SAS’ roles include counter terrorism, hostage rescue and covert reconnaissance. Currently the corps is made up of the 22 Special Air Service Regiment, the 21 Special Air Service Regiment (Reserve) and the 23 Special Air Service Regiment (Reserve). In order to become part of the Regiment, soldiers have to pass a number of exercises and tests during a five-week-long selection process. Although there are around 200 applicants each time, only 30 usually make it through. The first SAS mission was in 1941 and involved a parachute drop in support of the Operation Crusader offensive. This mission, due [...]

The Parachute Regiment

The Parachute Regiment, also known as “The Paras”, is an airborne regiment of the British Army that acts as support to the United Kingdom Special Forces. The Parachute Regiment was formed to surprise enemy troops by being dropped behind enemy lines to capture key positions. They were then able to hold them until the rest of the invasion force could link up with them. In modern day warfare the Parachute Regiment provides infantry to Britain’s 16 Air Assault Brigade. The Parachute Regiment was formed during the Second World War on the 22nd of June. This is the only infantry regiment of the British Army that has not been amalgamated with another since the end of the Second World War. They are able to deploy an infantry force at short notice. The Parachute Regiment consists of three regular army battalions; the 1st, 2nd and 3rd battalion. The 1st is based in St Athan, Wales and is attached to the Special Forces Support [...]

Cap Tally

Custom Design Cap Tally

A Cap Tally is a black nylon ribbon which is usually tied into a bow on the left-hand side of a Royal Navy sailor’s cap. The tally is black with a gold inscription and usually bears the name of the ship to which the sailor belongs. During World War II the ship’s name was often left off the cap tally to protect the ship from any espionage. A Cap Tally bow is notoriously difficult to tie. The ribbon is wrapped round the hat, with the inscription positioned in the middle of the hat. A bow is tied to the left of the cap. Watch the video below to learn how to tie your cap tally. Wyedean stocks many different Cap Tallies for the Royal Navy. To view our range click here. We are also able to manufacture bespoke cap tallies with a custom name. Please note that due to the setup of the machine, each design comes as a set of two. The [...]

How to wear an Aiguillette

An aiguillette is an ornamental braided cord, usually worn on a uniform to denote an honour. Although similar in some ways to a lanyard, the two should not be confused. Lanyards are made from fibre, whereas aiguillettes are usually made from silver or gold cord. Aiguillettes also have pointed tips. Plates of armour used to be secured together by attaching the breast and back plates with short loops of cord acting as a hinge on one side, while a more ornate loop was tied to support the arm defences on the other. As armour became more ornamental so did these ties. After the civil wars it became fashionable to have bunches of ribbons worn at the shoulder sometimes in the form of bows with tagged ends. This fashion died out in England but continued in the French court dress of Louis the 14th and 15th into the early 18th century. This style was revived by the British Army in the form [...]

What is the Best Looking Military Uniform?

The Hussars The uniform of the Napoleonic Hussars included the pelisse: a short fur-edged jacket which was often worn slung over one shoulder in the style of a cape, and was fastened with a cord. This garment was extensively adorned with braiding (often gold or silver for officers) and rows of multiple buttons. The tunic was worn underneath, which was also decorated in braid. The Hussar’s accoutrements included a Hungarian-style saddle, covered by a decorated saddlecloth, with long pointed corners surmounted by a sheepskin. On active service the Hussar normally wore reinforced breeches which had leather on the inside of the leg to prevent them from wearing. On the outside of their breeches was a row of buttons, and sometimes a stripe in a different colour. A busby was worn as headwear. The colours of the dolman, pelisse and breeches varied greatly by regiment, even within the same army. Hussars were the only corps in the British Army allowed to wear moustaches. The [...]

What is the Official use of a Lanyard?

  Soldier’s Uniform wearing lanyard. A lanyard is also referred to a fourragère – and is a braided cord with a sharp spike at one end. The fourragère is a very old component of some military uniforms and originates from the French uniforms where it was used to bundle forage for pack animals or cavalry horses. The lanyard first gained symbolic importance during the Dutch Revolt from 1568-1648. It is said that the Duke of Alba’s troops fled the field against the Dutch rebels. The Duke was so angry that he vowed to hang every single man in the unit if they retreated again and consequently forced them to wear a fourragère, or lanyard, around their shoulder to remind them of the fact. After the next battle the Duke of Alba was so impressed by their bravery that he them permitted them to wear the cord as a reminder of their oath to fight The symbol was later revived by Napoleon for the [...]