Monthly Archives - August 2018

Windsor Castle

Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle

The Constables and Governors of Windsor Castle take charge of Windsor Castle on behalf of the Sovereign. The Constable does not receive a salary but lives in the Castle. Day-to-day operations are looked after by the Superintendent who is an officer of the Royal household. Since 1660 the posts of Constable and Governor have been joined as one. They are also in charge of their garrison, including the Windsor Castle Guard of the Foot Guards of the Household Division. The office was filled by a member of the Royal Family from 1833 to 1957, but is now held by a senior retired officer of the armed forces of the Crown and so is their representative. The current Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle is Admiral Sir James Perowne who was born in 1947. During his career he served on HMS Opportune, HMS Superb and HMS Boxer. He retired in 2002.

Medals in wear

How to wear your Medals

The British Armed Forces recognise outstanding personal achievements by giving individuals from the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force and British Army various awards and decorations. Medals, ribbons and emblems awarded by HM The Queen are only permitted to be worn by the recipient. Whether friend or family, wearing someone else’s awards is classed as fraud. Ribbons can be worn without the medals themselves, apart from The Orders of the Garter and Thistle. Ribbons are to be worn over the left breast pocket button in the centre of the pocket. The ribbons are worn in rows with the most senior medal worn nearest the jacket lapel or front buttons, and in the top row if multiple rows are worn. The number of ribbons worn in a row depends on the width of the breast pocket, however, if the uniform has no breast pocket then the number of ribbons worn must be no more than five. If there is an incomplete row of [...]

HMS Hurworth

Mine Counter-Measure Vessels

During the 1990s the Royal Navy had two classes of off-shore patrol vessels: Island-class and Castle-class. In 1997, however, these were replaced by River-class which featured much larger vessels. The largest patrol vessel is HMS Protector which is a dedicated Antarctic patrol ship. There are also mine counter-measure vessels currently in service, including: the Sandown-class mine-hunters and the Hunt-class vessels. Hunt-class vessels have mechanical devices known as ‘sweeps’ used for disabling mines, while modern ships are soundproofed to reduce the chances of detonating the mines. Minesweeper vessels differ considerably to minehunter vessels. While minehunter vessels detect and neutralise mines, minesweepers clear open waters containing large numbers of mines.  Both vessels are formally referred to as mine counter-measure vessels (MCMV). There are various Royal Navy bases for the Mine Counter-Measures Squadron. HM Naval Base Clyde and Faslane are two of them. The First mine Counter-Measures Squadron (MCM1) recently received the Surface Flotilla Efficiency Trophy for keeping sea lanes safe from mines. When operating overseas, the [...]